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1 



T he Ranger 

presents Kegis 

on the crest of the west 




• • • • 




through the years 



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The college building in Las Vegas, N.M. during the 1870's. 



The history of Regis spans ninety years from its 
first beginning in 1867 when a pioneer group of Jesuits 
from Naples, Italy arrived in Santa Fe to assist in the 
New Mexico Territory. Their assistance had been re- 
quested by Bishop Lamy during his visit to Rome the 
previous year. The Jesuit Fathers assumed the paro- 
chial duties in Albuquerque and founded a school that 
after some argument with the territorial government 
became a public school. The arrangement was not 
satisfactory, and in 1873 a so-called college was opened 
within the residence of the Fathers in Albuquerque. It 
was then given the name of Holy Family College. The 
whole effort turned out to be a failure. At the invita- 
tion of the inhabitants of Las Vegas the Jesuits es- 
tablished Sacred Heart College which first opened for 
class in 1877. The school well served the needs of the 



natives, for although called a college it was actually 
more of a grammar school. Financial difficulties 
plagued the establishment as the natives keeping their 
dollars preferred to pay in cattle, sheep, and grain. 
The Santa Fe Railroad reached Las Vegas in 1879 and 
proved to be a great boon to the city and the college 
as well. But this proved to be the peak of Las Vegas' 
prosperity as the main railroad tracks were stretched 
across Colorado. Hard years followed and during the 
term of office of Father Pantanella, the last president's 
term of office it became certain that the college in Las 
Vegas could not survive. When, therefore, Bishop 
Machebeuf offered his assistance to help found a col- 
lege in his diocese of Denver, Father Pantanella looked 
eagerly to the north and while Las Vegas was still in 
existence the foundation at Morrison was laid. 



Page 



The opening of a college for Catholic young men 
somewhere in Colorado, near Denver, and taught by 
the Jesuits was one of Bishop Machebeufs fondest 
dreams. For many years this hope had eluded him, but 
in 1883 he saw his chance and travelled to Las Vegas 
to attend the graduation ceremonies at Sacred Heart 
College and while he was there convinced the Jesuits 
to make the move to Morrison. The Swiss Cottage, also 
called the Evergreen Hotel, was turned over, furnish- 
ings and all, to the Society. Due to very hasty prepara- 
tions to open, the enrollment at Morrison was small the 
first year but in the next few years a sizeable increase 
was made in the student body. Noted visitors were 
enthusiastic over what they saw when visiting the Col- 
lege. One visitor from New York, wrote the following, 
an excerpt from his article in a New York paper: 

"An hour's ride bv railroad from Denver brought 
us to the village of Morrison, a rural hamlet almost at 
the mouth of a magnificent canyon. Having recovered 
from the surprise of finding a college in such surround- 
ings, the visitor is prepared to find a primitive kind of 
building, rudely finished and scantily furnished, where 
the pupils are prepared for the rough life of the West. 



Now the wonder is just this; This mountain college is 
more completely equipped and beautifully furnished 
than any college I have ever seen though I have been 
in many lands of much pretentions." 

While Sacred Heart College was at Morrison a ter- 
rific cloudburst occurred higher up the canyon; a cow- 
boy came dashing in on horseback shouting to all to 
get to safety. Soon a wall of water, to be repeated 
many times in the years to come, hit the town, de- 
molished the depot, scattered the cars of the train like 
matches, ripped up the track, tore down the buildings 
and created awesome havoc. The college however was 
safely out of danger because of its location on the hill. 

From the beginning, the Morrison site was under- 
stood to be temporary. In the 1880's it was considered 
to be tucked too far back in the mountains and easy 
access was only by railroad. Father Pantanella, the 
rector, began to look for a more suitable location. The 
location was not Denver but Colorado Springs. How- 
ever, Bishop Machebeuf heard of this development and 
persuaded Father to move to Denver. And so Denver 
it was. 



The building which served as the college during the early days in Morrison, Colo. 




School spirit is an integral part of the College, and 
the students responsible for maintaining and stimulat- 
ing this spirit at Regis are the cheerleaders. Sparking 
the team with their yells, the cheerleaders stimulate 
enthusiasm and arouse spirit at the pep rallies and 
games. 




Page 4 




The peacefulness of college life is epit- 
omized in this view of the St. John Fran- 
cis Regis Chapel. Seen through the au- 
tumn foliage along a winding drive, this 
center of religious life on campus, though 
physically not pretentious, plays a major 
role in the shaping of the character of 
the student. 



Carroll Hall, the upperclass residence hall, was the 
first dormitory erected on the Regis campus. An aura 
of tradition envelops this realm of upperclassmen where 
is centered much of the life and student activity which 
is so much a part of college life. 





The Administration Building during the construction. 



In 1877 two rival land companies were booming 
Denver; one out on East Colfax and the other "The 
Highland" over in north Denver. Lack of sufficient 
viaducts kept the north side from developing faster 
and earlier. John Brisben Walker got control of the 
company that was booming the north side. The ground 
had been plowed, levelled, and divided into city blocks, 
trees planted and in a short time houses sprang up. 
To advertise his company's holdings Walker offered 
Father Pantanella forty acres on any site Father would 
choose. After a very fine and exacting investigation 
Father liked two locations. One was about a mile and 
a half southeast of the present Saint Vincent's Orphan- 
age, near West 39th Avenue within the city limits and 
near two streetcar lines. These lines were to be ex- 
tended in the very near future. The other site was the 
present location of the college. Father chose the latter 
location because of the magnificent setting the college 
would possess and felt that would be the reason for 
drawing Denver toward the college. Sixty years ago 
the college was surrounded by waste land. Today Den- 
ver has moved to its very gates. Part of the forty acres 
were in Jefferson County, but Father Pantanella 
brought it about that the whole property would be 
within the city of Denver limits and thus assure city 
protection, utilities and conveniences. The Land Com- 
pany agreed to give the land and the Jesuits agreed to 



build a building not less than two hundred and ninety- 
seven feet long, nor less than sixty feet in height and to 
contain at least four floors, and walls of stone. The 
building was completed within eighteen months. 

A non-Catholic friend of Father Pantanella, a cer- 
tain Mr. B. K. Perrin, offered Father an additional ten 
acres, immediately adjoining the property given by Mr. 
Walker. John Walker also granted that the students of 
the new institution could swim and fish in "Welfe 
Lake" ( now Rocky Mountain Lake ) since the lake was 
on his property. 

Ground was broken for the building on September 
13, 1887. The total cost was $111,846. Father Pan- 
tanella did not have so large a sum of money so he bor- 
rowed from Europe, paying a low interest of four per 
cent. At this time other buildings were also con- 
structed, those buildings which are still behind the 
gymnasium. These buildings were a bakery and a laun- 
dry. A horse barn was constructed to the rear of the 
present site of the student chapel. This building was 
taken down in 1901 because of the construction of the 
larger and more efficient barn which still stands. It 
was the dairy expansion which necessitated this con- 
struction because of the increase in the enrollment of 
the student body. 



'age 6 






The then ultimate in transportation was the car- 
riage such as the elegant one which is pictured hefore 
the newly finished Administration Building during the 
1890's. Sacred Heart College w a s considerably re- 
moved from little Denver and a lengthy drive was 
necessary before the iron gates and maple-lined drive 
came into view. 

In the picture below a student is seen sitting atop 
the gymnasium which was covered by a thirty-foot drift 
of snow which began behind the Administration Build- 
ing and completely covered the smaller structure. The 
scene shown occurred in a snowstorm in 1913 during 
which time the mean snowfall was four feet. The city 
was paralyzed by this unprecedented storm and for two 
weeks a streetcar was stranded at the corner of the 
college campus. 

When the college was still young and much of the 
land was farmed, the lake was a large body of water. 
The filled-in remains of today give no indication of the 
size that the lake once was. Swimming, boating, and 
ice skating were popular activities centered around 
Sundance Lake. In the deeper parts the water was over 
ten feet deep. The island was in the middle as it is 
now and was a grassy and tree-shaded refuge. The 
lake was formed by mountain water emptying into it 
from the irrigation system of the school's farm. 




Administration Building in "Gay-Nineties.' 



Student on Gym roof. 



The lake when it was really a lake. 





Page 7 



O'Connell Hall, a new residence for underclassmen, 
boldly faces west to the mountains and nearby Carroll 
Hall. It is in this hall that underclassmen get then- 
first taste of college life tackling books and making new 
friends. 



Page 8 





Most prominent of the many signs of progress on 
the campus is the new Student Center completed in 
the fall of 1957. This modern structure is the scene of 
much of the college's social life from coffee hours to 
school functions in the evening. 



The Administration Building, the oldest building on 
campus, peers down the drive to the gates. The old 
structure houses the administrative offices and the 
residence of the Jesuit faculty which makes it for many 
students the least frequented place on campus. 






?! S Si f 9 E B 8 








The Student Body in the 1880s. 




The senior wing of the Dormitory. 



The class system of the college was radically dif- 
ferent from what it was before 1920 and what it is 
today. An eight-year course comprised a scholar's col- 
lege education; the high school, which is so important 
today, did not exist and what passed for it was a strictly 
college preparatory system of classes. Four lower grades 
were called the academics and were distinguished by 
numbers; one, two, three A, and three B; they con- 
stituted what is now known as high school. The fresh- 
man year of college was known as Humanities, the 
sophomore as Poetry, the junior as Rhetoric, the senior 
as Philosophy. No diploma was given at the end of 
"high school" and only one degree at the end of col- 
lege, the Bachelor of Arts. For the purpose of activi- 
ties, the grounds were divided into the Senior Yard for 
the more mature students whether they were in college 
or not. The Junior Yard was for all the smaller boys 
who were not as physically and mentally mature as 
those in the Senior Yard. The small picture shows the 
Senior dormitory in the Administration Building. This 
was located in the west end of the fourth floor. The 
other dormitories were located on the rest of the fourth 
floor. The stage at the end of the room was used for 
plays, debates, and graduation. The area has been va- 
cated, made into private rooms and is now used for 
rooms for the faculty. 



Page 10 



As can be seen from the picture of the main en- 
trance in 1900, Regis was, to a certain extent, in the 
country. The street that now passes in front of the 
gate was merely a dirt road and no houses were near 
for some distance. 

It was during this era that much of the land of the 
college was cultivated for crop-raising. An apple or- 
chard once grew where Loyola and Carroll Halls now 
stand. These trees were transplanted behind the gym- 
nasium and many of them still are growing. A field of 
alfalfa marked the future area of the Student Center. 
Fields of hay were behind the lake and other fields 
reached eastward to Federal Boulevard. 

The water for irrigating the fields was brought in 
through a pipe which ran beneath the street and came 
from its source by means of a ditch which brought 
water in from Clear Creek. Remains of this ditch may 
be seen on Fiftieth. This mountain water was also the 
source of the water in the lake. 




A sight long absent from campus. 







Main entrance on 50th Street in 1900. 



Page 11 



The term "Colorful Colorado" needs no more ex- 
planation than in the fall of the year when the aspen 
turn gold. This scenery backed by the timeless moun- 
tains lures the scholars from their texts and into the 
hills each fall. 



Red Mountain 




Page 12 




Maroon Bells 



The frigidly cold lake and the forbiddingly frozen 
mountains are part of the scenery which greets the 
exodus of skiers who make their pilgrimage to the pop- 
ular winter ski resort at Aspen. 




Carroll Hall in recent times. 




The name of the college was changed from Sacred 
Heart to Regis at the time of the beginning of the con- 
struction of Carroll Hall. The school was reincorpo- 
rated under the name of Regis College by the state 
legislature in 1921. The main reason for the change 
was the embarrassment which resulted from the man- 
ner in which the name Sacred Heart was frequently 
used in the sport section of the newspapers. 

Carroll Hall was opened in 1923 and became the 
main building of the college. A fund-raising was con- 
ducted by the alumni to raise the money that was 
necessary to pay for the construction. This drive was 
a failure and the school was forced to cany a heavy 
mortgage during the depression. The majority of the 
classes were held in this building until the construc- 
tion of DeSmet and Loyola Halls. It was not until after 
the war that the dormitory in the Administration Build- 
ing was abandoned and moved to Carroll Hall. 



The area in front of Administration Building. 



Page 14 



The present site of the shrine now occupies the 
ground floor where the famous grotto once stood. This 
landmark was taken down in 1950 because of the 
amount of upkeep necessary to maintain it properly. 
Many people still feel keenly the loss of such a famous 
place of devotion which had become so much an inte- 
gral part of Regis. The sprawling edifice was the life- 
long work of Brother Ben Tovani S. J., the man whose 
love for the beauties of nature at one time made Regis 
such a beautiful and attractive campus. This dedicated 
religious whose extreme devotion to the Blessed Mother 
inspired him to construct and enlarge the grotto 
through the years until there was an altar in an 
underground cave and a dozen statues standing in 
niches along the labyrinth of paths which wound their 
way through the magnificent vegetation. As can be 
seen in the picture below, which was taken in 1923 the 
Regis of today was beginning to emerge. Lining the 
main drive was a double row of stately maple trees 
with their branches entwined to form a veritable tunnel 
of green. These trees have given way to the march of 
progress, but it is hoped that in the Regis of the future 
maples will again assume their places as silent sentinels. 







The famed grotto of Regis. 



The gates and tree lined drive in early 1920's. 




Page 15 






se ffanqer tor 









was 
Regis 






book was published by Newsfot© Publishing Co. 

of San Ange!©, Texas 




Page 16 




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Asst. Editor 
Sports Editor 
Bus. Editor 




Queens 



CONTENTS 



Athletics 122 

Organizations . . .156 

92 Activities 190 

.110 Advertising .... 236 



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O'Neal 
| . . .^^Jim O'Connor 
V ^r> ^^ Bob Britt 

Terry Welsh 

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Page 17 



dedication 



Warmth and spontaneity reflected in his smile and 
eagerness to help the student— these are the qualities 
which have indelibly inscribed the Rev. John J. Quirk, 
S. J., in the memories of Regis men. 

A professor of English and French, Father Quirk 
instilled in his students a thorough knowledge of 
language. As moderator of THE RANGER and of the 
Student Senate and as director of Carroll Hall, he 
worked closely with the students, ever serving as close 
friend and counsellor to all those with whom he came 
in contact. 



True to the Jesuit tradition, Father Quirk has given 
up the material comforts that existed in campus life at 
Regis and, answering the call of Christ, has set forth 
to become a missionary in British Honduras. 

Regis' loss is the gain of St. John's College in Belize. 
The selflessness, personal warmth, and tremendous 
devotion that characterized Father Quirk at Regis will 
undoubtedly mark the missions as they marked Regis 
College and the Regis student. 






Pare 19 



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FACULTY 






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the president 





It is once again my pleasure to address this letter to you graduates and 
students of Regis. I hope that you share my feelings of satisfaction and expecta- 
tion as we end the 1957-58 school year. It has been an exciting as well as an 
exacting year. 

The excitement has been due in large measure to the thrill of seeing the 
campus transformed into a more attractive setting for the business of education. 
O'Connell Hall and the Student Center have added greatly to our ability to 
adequately care for the growing student population. 

I have frequently received your assurances that the new buildings and land- 
scaping have added to your pleasure during the year. Living quarters were more 
enjoyable and more comfortable, and study easier and more efficient. Eating 
facilities, as well as recreational and leisure-time areas, were improved many 
times with the opening of the Student Center. The campus itself was made 
more attractive. 

All of these things, I believe, are in part responsible for another improve- 
ment: that of student morale, cooperation and leadership. In these areas par- 
ticularly I feel we have made great progress during the past year, and I would 
like to take this opportunity to personally thank and congratulate those who 
have been responsible. 

To you seniors, I am sure you are fully cognizant of the problems and re- 
sponsibilities you are about to meet, but I would like to single out one area in 
particular in which I hope you will concentrate some portion of your future 
activities. 

It may sound strange, coming as it does as you graduate from college, but 
I would encourage you to continue the education you have begun at Regis. 

Whether your future education be of the formal type in a graduate school 
of your choice, or of the informal variety in your personal reading and research, 
you have not only the privilege but the obligation to make your ideas and judg- 
ments felt in the various fields you will enter. 

We are living in a materialistic society, but your training has shown the 
false values which underlie this type of philosophy. Your continued mental and 
spiritual growth and the application of your wisdom to large and small prob- 
lems are obligations I am confident you can meet with courage and distinction. 
May God prosper you always. 



Sincerely, 





RICHARD F. RPVN, S.J. 
President 



Page 23 




THE ADMINISTRATION, left to right: J. Coyne, Ass't. Dean; 
Frs. B. Karst, Director of Carroll Hall; W. Harris, Chaplain; 
L. Mattione, Dean; F. Malecek, Dean of Men; J. Gibbons, 
Registrar. 





Rev. Louis G. Mattione, S.J. 
Dean of Studies 



Rev. Francis J. Malecek, S.J. 
Dean of Students 



Page 24 






lev. J. Gibbons, S.J. 
Registrar 



Rev. W. Houser, S.J. 
Treasurer 



Rev. B. Karst, S.J. 
Director of Carroll Hall 






lev. B. Murray, S.J. 
Spiritual Father 



Rev. W. Steiner, S.J. 
Director of O'Connell Hall 



Rev. A. Verdieck, S.J. 
Father Minister 



administration 



"For the true Christian must live a supernatural life in Christ 
For precisely this reason Christian education takes in the whole 
aggregate of human life, physical and spiritual, intellectual and 
moral, individual, domestic and social, not with a view of 
reducing it in any way, but in order to elevate, regulate and 
perfect it, in accordance with the example and teaching 
of Christ."* The Regis Administration admirably leads both 
the faculty and the student body, coordinates all their 
activities and funnels them into one smoothly running stream. 

* Christian Education of Youth 
Pius XI 



Page 25 




social 
sciences 

"Societies are built of men, by men and for men. 
Social order is the climate in which man 
can live a full life. But man cannot build his 
societies aright unless he understands 
himself and his destiny. ( Henri de Lubac has 
said ) : 'It is not true as sometimes seems to 
be said, that without God man cannot organize 
the world. What is true is that, in the last 
analysis, without God he can only organize 
the world against himself.' This is the 
fundamental premise that affords the Faculty of 
Social Sciences its goal and directive. 

Social Order, May-June, 1953 



Rev. H. Stansell, S.J., Department Head 









Mr. C. Baier 
Instr. of History 



Rev. L. Cervantes, S.J. 
Prof, of Sociology 



Rev. C. Kruger, S.J. 
Asst. Prof, of Speech 





Miss A. Laughlin 
Lecturer in Sociology 



Mr. G. Stocking 
Instr. in Education 



26 




commerce 

and 

finance 



"Since the present economics regime is based 
mainly upon capital and labor, it follows that 
the principles of right reason and Christian social 
philosophy regarding capital, labor and their 
mutual cooperation must be accepted in theory 
and reduced in practice." Through the 
proper adaptation of this truth to its own 
specific fields the Faculty of Commerce 
and Finance gives to today's world Christian 
business men and economists. 

Quadragesimo Anno 
Pius XI 



Mr. J. Coyne, Department Chairman 




N.T" 






|r. M. Dolan 
Instr. in Accounting 



Mr. P. Rotar 

Asst. Prof. Bus. Admin. 



Mr. R. Sporcich 
Instr. in Accounting 





Mr. F. Wiesner 
Instr. in Accounting 



Rev. E. Wintergalen, S.J. 
Assoc. Prof, of Economics 



Pare 27 




philosophy 

and 
theology 



The Faculty of Philosophy and Theology by 
its preoccupation with God and the results 
of His creative activity affords the integrating 
force to the many disparate sciences taught 
at Regis College. By unfolding for the 
student his transcendent, supernatural destiny, 
it illuminates for him the hierarchy in 
creation and his own hierarchial place there. 



Rev. H. Klocker, S.J. Department Chairman 






Rev. C. Bonnet, S.J. 
Assoc. Prof. Philosophy 



Mr. J. Flanagan 

Asst. Prof, of Psychology 



Rev. M. Gross, S.J. 
Assoc. Prof, of Theology 





Page 28 



Rev. W. Harris, S.J. 
Instr. of Theology 



Most Rev. B. Sullivan, S.J.. D.D. 
Prof, of Theology 




Rev. R. Boyle, S.J. Chairman of Department 




humanities 



The Faculty of Humanities aims to demonstrate 
to students the artistic approach to reality; 
to help them see the thing itself, to understand 
the reasons for it, to develop techniques for 
dealing with it. This implies a close familiarity 
with worthwhile literature of all ages, 
ancient and modern and of all languages. 





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1 * 



lev. L. Bloomer, S.J. 
°rof. in English 



Rev. Richard Bocklage, S.J. 
Instr. in English 



Mr. D. Kline 

Asst. Prof, in English 



'0 



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lev. J. Lyons, S.J. 
r nstr. in English 




Rev. J. Jolin, S.J. 

Prof. Classical Language 




Rev. J. Quirk, S.J. 

Asst. Prof, of 

Modern Language Page 29 




Rev. F. Daly, S.J., Department Chairman 




science 

and 

mathematics 



"The Catholic philosopher or scientist who offers 
a temperate and understanding interpretation 
of a new discovery is doing a most important 
work. ... If his evaluation is subsequently 
confirmed, the belief in his understanding of 
matters of faith is enhanced. So high is 
the premium of truth." The Faculty of Natural 
Science and Mathematics of Regis College 
devotes itself to the formation of such a scientist. 



Marston Morse, America 





■■ 4 



Bm 



J 




Rev. J. Downey, S.J. 
Prof, of Physics 



Mr. F. Ozog 
Prof, of Chemistry 



Rev. A. Rochel, S.J. 
Instr. in Physics 






Rev. A. T. Singleton 
Instr. in Mathematics 

Page 30 



Rev. G. Tipton, S.J. 
Prof, of Physics 



Rev. E. Trame, S.J. 
Prof, of Biology 



physical education 



1^ ^ 



1 



V, 



"Mens sana in corpore sano" 
The Faculty of Physical Education, through 
its rounded curriculum of athletic endeavors, 
provides that often neglected facet of 
education, the education of the body. As 
the mind must be trained to achieve 
truth, so must the body be developed to make 
of the student a wholly educated man. 



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At. H. Moore 

Varsity Basketball Coach 



Mr. E. Ripley 
Asst. Varsity 
Basketball Coach 



library staff 




As professional assistants to all the Faculties of 
the College, the librarians render invaluable 
aid to the student in his studies and research 
and to the professor in his class planning 
and continuing study and research. Fountains 
of information acquired through their 
close association with the books they love, 
they facilitate the labors of the entire college. 




vlrs. Roman Borgerding 
'lead Librarian 



Miss Rosemary Frank 
Asst. Librarian 



Page 31 







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Internationa! Economics 



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seniors 



class of 1958 




Frank Cambria, President; 
Larry Springer, Vice-President; 
Jim Raine, Secretary; 
Joe Cummings, Treasurer; 
Hank Close, Student 
Senate Representative. 




«"* "■* 



V 





Kenneth J. Babbitt 
Flagstaff, Arizona 

B.S., Business Administration 
Sodality; Glee Club; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Ski Club; St. 
John Berchman's Society; 
Ski Team. 



Edward R. Beauvais 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Varsity Baseball; 

Alpha Kappa Psi; R. Club. 



Thomas C. Birdsall 
St. Louis, Missouri 

B.S., Economics 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Ski Club; 
The Brown and Gold; 
Missouri Club. 



4 

i 



Sidney A. Blubough 
Wichita, Kansas 

B.S., Biology 
Dean's List; Director of 
Student Senate; Biology 
Club; Cheerleader; Student 
Prefect; Who's Who; Biology 
Lab Director. 




seniors 



William J. Bollwerk 
St. Louis, Missouri 

B.S., History 

Student Senate President; R 
Club; Who's Who; Freshman 
and Varsity Basketball; The 
Brown and Gold; Freshman 
Class President; Junior Class 
Vice President; Mo. Club. 



Robert M. Borgerding 
Beloit, Wisconsin 

B.S., History 

Alpha Delta Gamma; 

Vet's Club. 




Roman Borgerding 
Dutzow, Missouri 

B.S., English 
Dean's List; Glee Club; 
Sodality Vice President; St 
John Berchman's Society; 
The Brown and Gold; 
F.T.A.; Ranger, Freshman 
Class President. 



Michael Brophy 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

B.S., Mathematics 
Dean's List; Intramurals; 
Sodality; Glee Club; St. 
John Berchman's Society. 




Robert G. Buckley 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., English 
Varsity Baseball; Ski 
Club; R Club. 



Frank A. Cambria 
Brooklyn, New York 

B.S., English 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Ski 
Club; Biology Club; Senior 
Class President; Glee Club. 



Vincent F. Carbone 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., 

History Club, President; 
F.T.A., Treasurer; Glee 
Club; Italian Club; 
Denver Club. 



Donald J. Champeau 
Leadville, Colorado 

B.S., Accounting 
Student Council; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Who's Who; St. 
John Berchman's Society. 




Joseph L. Chase 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Accounting 
Sodality; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Circle K International; Vet's 
Club; Denver Club; 
Accounting Club. 



John B. Chavez 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Biology 

Italian Club; Spanish Club; 

Denver Club. 



Uvaldo S. Chavez 


Henry J. Close 


Denver, Colorado 


Wihnette, Illinois 


B.S., History 


A.B., Philosophy 


F.T.A. 


Dean's List; Ski Club; 




Sodality; St. John Berchman's 




Society; The Brown and 




Gold, Editor; The Ranger; 




Aquinas Academy; Class 




Officer; Who's Who. 



Pace 36 



/ 

Romuald P. Compton 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Mathematics 
Denver Club. 





Joseph P. Cummings 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., History 

Italian Club; Denver Club, 
President; Dramatic Club, 
Vice-President; Senior Class, 
Treasurer; Who's Who. 



Edward L. Curran 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; R Club; Denver 

Club; Rho Chi Sigma. 



Michael C. Dollahan 
Chicago, Illinois 

A.B., English 

Dean's List; Sodality; Glee 
Club; Ski Club; St. John 
Berchman's Society; The 
Brown and Gold; The 
Ranger; Chicago Club. 




seniors 



Paul J. Doring 
Kansas City, Missouri 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Vet's 
Club. 



Arthur Durand 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Mathematics 
Glee Club; F.T.A. 



Michael W. Erhard 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

A.B., History 
Sodality; Glee Club; 
The Ranger, Class Editor; 
Denver Club; History Club. 



Edward H. Gallegos 
La Jam, Colorado 

B.S., Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Vet's Club; 

Spanish Club. 









John T. Gcrtens 
Charleston, West Virginia 

B.S., Sociology 

Varsitv Basketball; Varsity 

Baseball; R Club. 



John J. Gaynor 
Webster, Massachusetts 

B.S., Economics 

Ski Club; The Ranger, Asst. 

Bus. Mgr.; Sodality. 



Louis A. Gerweck 
Cheyenne Wells, Colorado 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Sodality; St. 

John Berchman's Society; 

F.T.A. 



Edward F. Gormley 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

B.S., History 

Ski Club; Biology Club; 

Vet's Club. 



4 




John G. Gould 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., History 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Sportman's 
Club; Vet's Club; 
Spanish Club. 



Charles A. Graham 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Economics 
Freshman Basketball; 
Sodality; Denver Club. 



Roger D. Gubbins 
Flossmoor, Illinois 

A.B., Philosophy 
Sodality; Glee Club; Ski 
Club; The Brown and Gold; 
Aquinas Academy; Tennis 
Team, Chicago Club. 



John V. Halaska 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 

B.S., Economics 
Sodality; The Brown and 
Gold. 



Page 38 




James J. Hanson 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S, English 

R Club; Italian Club; 

Denver Club. 



Warren C. Hartenbach 
Kirkwood, Missouri 

B.S., English 

Sodality; The Ranger; Circle 

K International; Who's Who. 




Richard W. Hasse 
Joliet, Illinois 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Rho Chi Sigma. 





s 



i 



Norman L. Haug 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Philosophy 

Dean's List; Denver Club; 

Biology Club. 




seniors 






Joseph W. Hawley 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; F.T.A.; 
Vet's Club; Who's Who. 





Ronald D. Hermes 
Spencer, Iowa 

B.S., Economics 
Rho Chi Sigma, Sec- 
Treasurer; Alpha Delta 
Gamma, Vice-President; 
The Brown and Gold; The 
Ranger; Circle K 
International; Vet's Glub. 



Richard P. Holland 
Wichita, Kansas 

B.S., Business Administration 



Sol W. Horn 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Philosophy 

F.T.A.; Aquinas Academy 




Michael H. Kennedy 
Richmond Heights, Missouri 

B.S., History 

Freshman Basketball; Alpha 
Delta Gamma; Golf Team; 
Missouri Club; St. John 
Berchman's Society. 



Martin R. Kopp 
Florissant, Missouri 

B.S., History 

Sodality; Band; Alpha Delta 
Gamma, Treasurer; Ski Club 
St. John Berchman's Society; 
The Brown and Gold; 
Missouri Club, President. 



James E. Krueger 
Emporia, Kansas 

B.S., Philosophy 
Aquinas Academy, 
Secretary and President 



George F. Lutito 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Economics 
Student Senate, Treasurer; 
Alpha Kappa Psi, President; 
Italian Club; Vice-President; 
Vet's Club, Treasurer; 
Who's Who. 













•""*"! 







Thomas J. Mansfield 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Natural Science 
Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Biology Club. 



Roger D. Martinez 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Sociology 
Sodality; Vet's Club. 



William McDonough 
Chicago, Illinois 

B.S., Economics 
Alpha Delta Gamma, 
Steward; Ski Club; 
Chicago Club. 



Donald E. Moore 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Economics 



Pace 40 




Robert D. Moynihan 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Sodality Union, 
President; Sodality, 
Secretary; The Brown and 
Gold; Aquinas Academy; 
Debate Club; Literary Club. 



Raymond D. Nass 
Plymouth, Illinois 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Student Senate, 
Secretary; Freshman and 
Varsity Basketball; Varsity 
Baseball; Alpha Delta 
Gamma, President; R Club; 
The Brown and Gold; The 
Ranger; Who's Who. 



William J. O'Donoghue 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Economics 

Alpha Delta Gamma; Ski 

Club; Glee Club. 



Llovd S. O'Hallearn 
Wheaton, Illinois 

B.S., English 

Student Council; Alpha 

Delta Gamma. 




seniors 



Michael J. O'Hallearn 
Wheaton, Illinois 

B.S., English 

Alpha Delta Gamma. 



Eugene P. O'Neal 
University City, Missouri 

B.S., Mathematics 
Sodality Prefect; Ski Club, 
President; The Ranger, 
Editor; Class Officer; 
Spanish Club; Initiation 
Co-ordinator; Who's Who. 



Louis L. Ortiz 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Sociology 

Spanish Club; Denver Club. 



Peter J. Paoli 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Biology 




George M. Park 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

B.S., English 

Sodality; Golf Team, Captain; 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Ski Club; 
R Club; The Brown and Gold. 



Louis S. Petralia 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Sociolgy 

Italian Club; Vet's Club, 

Vice-President; Sociology 

Club. 



James F. Pingpank 
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 

B.S., Sociology 

Varsity Baseball; Alpha Delta 

Gamma; R Club. 



James R. Raine 
Leadville, Colorado 

B.S., Business Administration 
Band, Manager; Glee Club; 
Alpha Kappa Psi, Vice- 
President; Ski Club; St. John 
Berchman's Society, 
President; The Brown and 
Gold; F.T.A.; Who's Who. 




Richard L. Rohrer 
Strasburg, Colorado 

B.S., Business Administration 
Freshman Basketball; 
Varsity Baseball; Band; 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Ski Club; 
Sportsman's Club; 
Circle K International. 



Paul A. Rotar 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Mathematics 

Dean's List; KREG Radio, 

Chief Engineer. 



Daniel E. Samide 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Philosophy 
The Brown and Gold, 
Editor; Aquinas Academy; 
Literary Club; Debate 
Society; Who's Who. 



Elvinio Sandoval 
Brighton, Colorado 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Sodality; Biology 

Club; Spanish Club, 

President. 






Page 42 




Anthony F. Santopietro 
Denver, Colorado 

B. S., Biology 
Dean's List. 



Robert J. Schenk 
Wichita, Kansas 

Divisional Major 

Ski Club; Biology Club. 




William J. Schmitz 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Histoiy 
Dean's List; F.T.A. 




Fred Scott 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



I 




seniors 



James R. Sena 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Student Senate, 
Vice-President; Literary 
Club; The Brown and Gold; 
Aquinas Academy; 
Who's Who. 



Ted Sermonet, Jr. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

B.S., Economics 
Dean's List; Student Senate, 
Dir.; Varsity Basketball; 
Alpha Delta Gamma, 
Pledgemaster; R Club; The 
Brown and Gold; Sophomore 
and Junior Class, President; 
Who's Who. 



Frank Sferra 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., History 
Sodality; F.T.A. ; Italian 
Club, Vice-President; The 
Ranger, Editor; Dramatic 
Club; Who's Who. 



Philip J. Sharkey 
Toulon, Illinois 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Student Senate, 
Director; Sodality; Alpha 
Delta Gamma; The Brown 
and Gold; The Ranger; 
Dramatic Club. 




Francis C. Shyne 
Frankfort, Kansas 

B.S., Philosophy 
Aquinas Academy. 



Robert J. Smilanic 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Accounting 
Vet's Club. 



Laurence J. Springer 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Mathematics 
Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Sportsman's Club; 
Denver Club, Sec.-Treasurer; 
F.T.A.; Denver Club. 



William P. Stewart 
Pueblo, Colorado 

B.S., Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma, Treasurer. 




George Summers 
Denver, Colorado 

Divisional Major 

Histoiy Club, Sec.-Treasurer; 

F.T.A.; Denver Club. 




■l 


0k, 
) 




Major Allen L. Tayl 
U.S. Army 
Denver, Colorado 


or 






B.S., Business Administration 



Howard Tritz 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Biology 

St. John Berchman's Society; 

Biology Club. 



Thomas G. Torrey 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Histoiy 

Dean's List; History Club; 

Literary Club. 



Page 44 




James C. Verretta 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Sociology 

Italian Club, President; 

Denver Club. 



Joseph Villarreal 
Antonito, Colorado 

B.S., Philosophy 
Aquinas Academy. 




Richard Vitry 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Mathematics 
Dean's List. 



James H. Weber 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Rho Chi Sigma. 




seniors 



Joseph Weber 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., English 
Freshman Basketball; 
Denver Club. 



Martin Welles 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

B.S., Sociology 
Alpha Delta Gamma; St. 
John Berchman's Society; 
KREG Radio, President; 
Milwaukee Club, President 



Frank J. Woertman 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Dramatic Club; 

Denver Club; Literary Club. 



Frank Zito 
Denver, Colorado 

B.S., Sociology 
F.T.A.; Italian Club. 




juniors 
class of 1959 



Junior officers: James Molchan, Student 
Senate Representative; Thomas Dean, 
Student Senate Secretary; Terry Sheehy, 
Vice-President; Charles McCarthy, President; 
Donald Dierks, Treasurer. 




Page 46 



Peter Avila 
Denver, Colo. 

James Babka 
Valley Park, Mo. 

Robert Bergkamp 
Garden City, Kans 



George A. Beutner 
Tomahawk, Wis. 

Henry C. Blum 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

Joseph J. Boyle 
Denver, Colo. 





juniors 




Lawrence E. Brady 
Denver, Colo. 

William M. Brady 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael R. Brophy 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 



James P. Butler 
Chicago, III. 

Leigh W. Callendar 
Sterling, Colo. 

John M. Cambria 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Eugene C. Cavaliere 
Denver, Colo. 

Carl L. Cecchine 
Denver, Colo. 

Vincent P. Cerrone 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 48 



Leo A. Chiolero 
Denver, Colo. 

Peter Cocozzela 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph J. Coogan Jr 
Denver, Colo. 




James W. Creamer 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph W. Culig 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Thomas K. Dean 
St Louis, Mo. 




juniors 




Frank J. Degenhart 
Atwood, Colo. 

Thomas DeRochie 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

Russel DeSa 
Los Banos, Calif. 



Francis M. Dierks 
Hot Springs, Ark. 

Leonard J. DiLisio 
Raton, N.M. 

David G. Dobbs 
Denver, Colo. 



Paul E. Doyle 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael V. Dwyer 
Denver, Colo. 

Edward E. Elliott 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 50 



Kenneth J. Espinozct 
Colorado Springs, Colo 

Donald J. Fisher 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert J. Goetz 
Denver, Colo. 




Thomas M. Griffin 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

Clem R. Hackenthal 
Denver, Colo. 

John C. Hammonn 
Bridgeport, Neb. 




juniors 









% m-i 






- ) .-"■■■ 

i f5s •' * ' 





Glen R. Herrick 
Leadville, Colo. 

Steve B. Humann 
Denver, Colo. 

James D. Keenan 
Denver, Colo. 



Richard E. Kelly 
Durango, Colo. 

William C. Kiefer 
Grand Junction, Colo. 

.Gerald G. Kilpatrick 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert D. Lalich 
Denver, Colo. 

Kenneth W. Lane 
Denver, Colo. 

John F. Lindeman 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Page 52 



Robert L. Linnenberger 
Denver, Colo. 

David L. Lunt 
Santa Fe, N. M. 

Charles J. McCarthy 
Taos, N. M. 




Regis P. Malloy 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

Vincent A. Mangus 
Louisville, Colo. 

Howard E. Marshall 
Napa, Calif. 




juniors 




Eleuterio J. Martinez 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

Manuel A. Martinez 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

William H. Meiers 
Arkansas City, Kans. 



James L. Molchan 
Peoria, 111. 

Patrick G. Moran 
Denver, Colo. 

Amo J. Muench 
Elm Grove, Wis. 



Matthew L. Nickels 
Aurora, III. 

Gerald J. Noe 
Denver, Colo. 

Emmett M. O'Brien 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Page 54 



James E. O'Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

John R. O'Rourke 
Tulsa, Okla. 

John E. Owens 
Denver, Colo. 




Victor A. Perrella 
Denver, Colo. 

Edward J. Powers 
Riverside, III. 

Raymond C. Reddick 
Denver, Colo. 




juniors 




Louis C. Rotter 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Ray F. Schneringer 
Denver, Colo. 

John C. Shea 
Hialeah, Fla. 



Terrence C. Sheehy 
Garden City, Kans. 

John E. Stanko 
San Marino, Calif. 

Jerry J. Steinauer 
Denver, Colo. 



Joseph H. Sullivan 
Douglas, Wijo. 

Samuel R. Sutton 
Pamona, Calif. 

John M. Tarabino 
Trinidad, Colo. 



Pace 56 



Robert M. Vcdko 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald E. Vollmer 
Denver, Colo. 

Carlo J. Walker 
Colorado Springs, Colo 




Michael K. Wanebo 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael K. Wilson 
Salina, Kans. 

John F. Yacobellis 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



sophomores 
class of 1960 



Sophomore officers: Jim Wetzel, Student Senate 
Rep.; Barry Dawson, Vice-President; Tony 
Cloutman, President; Tom Kukar, Secretary- 
Treasurer; Bill Whelan, Student Senate Alter- 
nate. 




Page 58 



Joseph Abramo 
Montrose, Colo. 

Dan Albert 
Goodland, Kans. 

George T. Allen 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



James E. Arvidson 
Keokuk, Iowa 

Jack N. Bailey 
Denver, Colo. 

Nicholas Baldwin 
Neenah, Wis. 



Donald E. Baltes 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard J. Barnes 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert Baumgartner 
Denver, Colo. 




Relax 



Be happy . . 



The worst is yet to come. 





sophomores 



v^v ■■■$-' : i/i 






'•'?r"W / 




t*4tM 



Jerry Beacom 

South Sioux City, Neb. 

Duane Beal 
Alliance, Neb. 

James Bennett 
Sioux City, Iowa 



Kenneth W. Blick 
Roggen, Colo. 

James F. Boatright 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald H. Eoeckman 
Denver, Colo. 



Dennis W. Boone 
Denver, Colo. 

William M. Brady 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert E. Britt 
Clayton, Mo. 



William L. Brown 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Robert A. Bruggeman 
Selden, Kans. 

Michael F. Burke 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



ts 



Page 60 



John A. Carbone 
Denver, Colo. 

Lewis A. Caricato 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Richard J. Chiodini 
Denver, Colo. 



Anthony J. Cloutman 
Salem, Mass. 

Stephen J. Compton 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald E. Cordova 
Trinidad, Colo. 



Benedict A. Cosimi 
Denver, Colo. 

George F. Coughlin 
Denver, Colo. 

Barry T. Dawson 
Denver, Colo. 




but it's a one party ticket. 



It isn't all fun. 



Sky Masterson. 





sophomores 




Patrick K. Dawson 
Grand Junction, Colo. 

Steve R. DiPaola 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Terry E. Dooher 
Denver, Colo. 



Louis V. Doyle 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Bernard J. Duncan 
Casper, Wyo. 

David H. Eby 
Denver, Colo. 



Pavmond Enqelhart 
West Allis, Wis. 

Robert L. Etzkorn 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas A. Everding 
Denver, Colo. 



Richard C. Eyre 
Denver, Colo. 

John R. Fehringer 
Peetz, Colo. 

Blair K. Farrell 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Page 62 






Theodore J. Foti 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Thomas P. Freeman 
Denver, Colo. 

Raymond C. Frenchmore 
Trinidad, Colo. 



John C. Fulham 
Denver, Colo. 

James F. Gahl 
West Allis, Wis. 

William J. Gannon 
Denver, Colo. 





sophomores 




William C. Gregory 
Climax, Colo. 

James B. Geyer 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

Donald J. Hall 
Rawlins, Wyo. 



Lawrence H. Hawn 
Denver, Colo. 

John W. Hartmeyer 
Muncie, Incl. 

Jerry L. Haushalter 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 



Edward Herrera 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard M. Hilmer 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Andrew K. Hudson 
Denver, Colo. 



Frederick F. Hules 
Glendale, Ariz. 

John F. Jaramillo 
Denver, Colo. 

Daniel G. Jiron 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 64 



James J. Kearney 
Monmouth, III. 

Richard E. Kelly 
Omaha, Neb. 

Ronald J. Kent 
Sterling, Colo. 



John W. Kirby 
Denver, Colo. 

Andrew M. Klein 
Prairie Village, Kans. 

Michael A. Lane 
Leadville, Colo. 



Jose S. Leon Guerrero 
Agania, Guam 

Michael J. Logan 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Daniel L. Loughman 
Holyoke, Colo. 




Don't look now, but . . 



Costumes or Aggies? 



Who invited them? 





sophomores 




Thomas J. Luepke 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Thomas Luttrell 
Denver, Colo. 

David C. McCarthy 
Grand Island, Neb. 



Robert M. McColm 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

James C. McCormick 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

John F. McDermott 
Denver, Colo. 



Frank P. Maggio 
Rockford, 111. 

Robert C. Mangus 
Louisville, Colo. 

Mario J. Mapelli 
Denver, Colo. 



Joseph F. Markey 
Denver, Colo. 

Harold D. Marcotte 
Salina, Kans. 

Lawrence D. Marguez 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 66 



William M. Marvel 
Denver, Colo. 

Keith J. Meisel 
Rock Falls, III. 

Michael R. Mejia 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert P. Merz 
West Allis, Wis. 

Raymond F. Meyer 
Ferguson, Mo. 

John G. Middleton 
Denver, Colo. 



James L. Miller 
Richmond Heights, Mo 

Gene L. Mueller 
New Baden, III. 

Paul M. Mulqueen 
Denver, Colo. 




Checked in late. 



Private secretary. 



Charleston. 





sophomores 



Gary L. Mynatt 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Raymond J. Nalty 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald F. Nemeth 
East Chicago, Ind. 



James E. Obst 
Dallas, Tex. 

James F. O'Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard J. O'Grady 
Lincoln, Neb. 



Michael J. O'Meara 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas J. Parisi 
Denver, Colo. 

William W. Roach 
Denver, Colo. 



David A. Rottino 
New York, N.Y. 

James M. Sambol 
Kansas City, Kans. 

Edward L. Santos 
Agana, Guam 



\ JBH / 



Pa ire 68 



William E. Schaefer 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

George A. Schieferecke 
Dresden, Kans. 

John T. Schippers 
Albuquerque, N. M. 



Jerome H. Schropfer 
Hohjoke, Colo. 

Stanley S. Shepard 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert G. Smith 
Belleville, Wis. 





sophomores 



Robert L. Stein 
Denver, Colo. 

James D. Styers 
Denver, Colo. 

Walter J. Swirczynski 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Robert E. Tafoya 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Stephen E. Telatnik 
Avon Lake, Ohio 

Ernest Tenderich 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas J. Torrez 
Denver, Colo. 

Kenneth R. Vendena 
Denver, Colo. 

James F. Vigil 
Denver, Colo. 



Lowell J. Volmer 
Draper, S. Dak. 

John O. Walker 
Cicero, 111. 

Jerome R. Walrond 
Clayton, III. 



Page 7() 



Terrence Welsh 
Great Bend, Kans. 

James M. Wetzel 
St. Louis, Mo. 

William J. Whelan 
Denver, Colo. 



Raymond F. Wilkinson 
Cheyenne, Wijo. 

Michael R. Williams 
Denver, Colo. 

John L. Williams 
Denver, Colo. 



Mario H. Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 

Emil B. Ziegler 
Denver, Colo. 

Bert F. Zumtobel 
Denver, Colo. 




Can I really come? 



They'll do anything for a picture. 



Say something in Philosophy. 




freshmen 
class of 1961 



Freshman officers, standing: Larry Meyer, 

Student Senate Alternate; E. V. Morales, 

Student Senate Alternate. 

Seated: Paul Horan, Student Council 

Representative; Joe Ryan, Vice-President; 

J. Tainter, President; Mike Mayer, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 




Page 72 



William M. Allen 
Denver, Colo. 

Rafael J. Almada 

Navoyoa, Sonora State, Mexico 

Paul D. Ban 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Theodore J. Baxth 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Darrell L. Beck 
Denver, Colo. 

Morris G. Beddoes 
Waterloo, Iowa 



John D. Bell 
Denver, Colo. 

Lawrence C. Blackford 
Denver, Colo. 

Frank E. Blatter 
Denver, Colo. 




What a mop! 



Dancing class for loretto dance 





freshmen 



Robert C. Boedeker 
Wilmette, III. 

Dennis A. Bohn 
Brentwood, Mo. 

Thomas Bowles 
Victorville, Calif. 



James L. Brisnehan 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph K. Burke 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

Brian C. Bums 
Lakewood, Colo. 



Bernard J. Bustos 
Trinidad, Colo. 

James W. Cabela 
Chappell, Neb. 

James J. Carney 
Denver, Colo. 



Francis J. Caufield 
Los Alamos, N.M. 

Frank Cawley 
Denver, Colo. 

Nicholas L. Cinocco 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 74 



John J. Civerolo 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

James T. Clark 
Wichita, Kans. 

Edward L. Clinton 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert J. Connelly 
Denver, Colo. 

John W. Crubaugh 
Dodgeville, Wis. 

Charles K. Danchertsen 
Tulsa, Okla. 



John F. Deasy, Jr. 
Wheatridge, Colo. 

John L. DeLeon 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert R. Dietz 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 




Down with the proletariat. 



Still training for Loretta dance. 



Marine PLC training. 




Page 75 




freshme 



n 



Donald F. Dillon 
Alliance, Neb. 

Ronald A. Distel 
Silverton, Colo. 

Garett M. Doherty 
Chicago, III. 



Thomas M. Donahue 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

John J. Dube 
Lajara, Colo. 

Lee R. Dunham 
Tulsa, OMa. 



Michael E. Dunn 
Denver, Colo. 

Anthony M. Dursey 
Denver, Colo. 

William A. Erskine 
Denver, Colo. 



Joseph W. Fabac 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

George J. Fabry 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert L. Fischer 
Denver, Colo. 



I 



Page 7fi 



Paul D. Fletcher 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Francis R. Flynn 
St. Louis, Mo. 

John G. Foley 
Wichita, Kans. 



Clem M. Frank 
Sterling, Colo. 

Richard J. Gabel 
Ft. Lupton, Colo. 

Dennis J. Gallagher 
Denver, Colo. 





fresh 



men 




Maurice F. Gatens 
Charleston, W. Va. 

John C. Geary 
LeodviUe, Colo. 

James P Godfrey 
Tulsa, Okla. 



James C. Gottschalk 
Garden City, Kans. 

Joseph M. Hammond 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick L. Honafee 
Champaign, III. 



Richard E. Handova 
Costa Mesa, Calif. 

Paul J. Hanly 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Thomas H. Harmer 
Rockford, III. 



Frank D. Hauser 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard B. Heil 
Richmond Heights, Mo. 

John W. Hennessey 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 78 



Craig A. Hibbison 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick T. Higgins 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Gordon A. Hill 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas F. Hitzelberger 
Chicago, III. 

R. Paul Horan 
Denver, Colo. 

William B. Houston 
Denver, Colo. 



Harry W. Humphreys 
Denver, Colo. 

Clyde D. Johnson 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Paul M. Johnson 
Denver, Colo. 




Graduate Philosophy students. 



Concentrated Study. 



Check my ID? 




m 










freshmen 



Wilbur F. Jordan 
Akron, Ohio 

Kenneth R. Joule 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

A. Michael Kailing 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Kennis M. Kennedy 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Harold A. Kiley 
Denver, Colo. 

David P. Kmitch 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas M. Koning 
Denver, Colo. 

John H. Kosednar 
West Allis, Wis. 

Louis J. Kosednar 
West Allis, Wis. 



Patrick W. Kosmicki 
Alliance, Nebr. 

Keith J. Kroneberger 
Denver, Colo. 

David N. Kummet 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 80 



■ 



Thomas C. Landauer 
Denver, Colo. 

Terry K. Lanoue 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas R. Larkin 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Robert A. Lennon 
Sioux City, la. 

Thomas A. Linnebur 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Robert T. Logue 
Sullivan, Mo. 



William E. Loehr 
Denver, Colo. 

Henry C. Lopez 
Denver, Colo. 

Peter L. Loskouski 
Lawrence, Mass. 



* s* m 




Poor Jud is dead. 



The Grand Army of The Republic 




Page 81 




freshmen 




Joseph M. Lyons 
Mitchell, So. Dak. 

Donald L. McClanahan 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas D. McConnell 
Carlsbad, N. M. 



Charles B. McCormick 
Denver, Colo. 

John L. McCoy 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Peter J. McLaughlin 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas F. Madden 
Denver, Colo. 

Hugh A. Mahoney 
Denver, Colo. 

James L. Mahoney 
Denver, Colo. 



Maurice Mahli 
Boulder, Colo. 

Dennis C. Marks 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lawrence W. Marrin 
Dalton, Nebr. 



Page 82 



James R. Martin 
Salina, Kans. 

Jimmy Martinez 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael F. Mayer 
Kansas City, Mo. 



John F. Meurer 
Kansas City, Mo. 

John L. Meyre 
Denver, Colo. 

Steve F. Meyer 
St. Louis, Mo. 




Thomas D. Michelli 
Walsenburg, Colo. 

Herbert C. Millard 
Rock Island, III. 

George S. Miller 
Palisades Park, N. J. 



**^& v x "*£**** 



; 5*r- 







>*r^ :?&* 




Wonder where the yellow went. 



Does Hook know you're here? 



What if he does? 





freshmen 



Evctristo Morales 
Evergreen, Colo. 

Edwin J. Morrison 
Hartland, Wis. 

Jesus G. Muna 
Agana, Guam 



Christopher J. O'Donnell 
Detroit, Mich. 

Owen P. O'Meara 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick H. O'Neill 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Daniel L. Otero 
Albuquerque, N. M. 

Terry D. Paoli 
McPherson, Kam. 

Ronald A. Perry 
Van Nuijs, Calif. 



James L. Pfanenstiel 
Salina, Kans. 

Thomas E. Pino 
Denver, Colo. 

Bruce W. Piper 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 84 



Robert D. Pipkin 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles R. Pitelkow 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lee R. Ragon 
Arvada, Colo. 



James L. Rauen 
Kenosha, Wis. 

Frank V. Reichwein 
North Hollywood, Calif. 

Mark E. Reinecke 
Aurora, Colo. 



Tom J. Remington 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Ralph F. Rhoades 
Denver, Colo. 

Gregory P. Rice 
Denver, Colo. 




I dreamed I went dancing in 



Accounting class in session. 



Wee Geordie. 




Page 85 




freshmen 




Ralph H. Richardson 
Denver, Colo. 

Leo R. Robison 
Climax, Colorado 

Michael J. Roblee 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Otto J. Rohlinger 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles J. Romano 
Denver, Colo. 

Kenneth R. Rozmiarek 
Denver, Colo. 



Alonzo N. Ruybal 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald L. Ryan 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph G. Ryan 
Denver, Colo. 



Ernest E. Salez 
San Pablo, Colo. 

Peter M. Sargent 
Canon City, Colo. 

Richard M. Schroer 
Hastings, Nebr. 



Page 86 



Thomas F. Schneider 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

John L. Schulte 
Casper, Wi/o. 

Edward A. Schwartz 
Denver, Colo. 



Monte D. Seidlinger 
Denver, Colo. 

Dennis H. Siems 
Denver, Colo. 

Ronald L. Skoglund 
Denver, Colo. 



Daniel K. Smith 
Denver, Colo. 

Jerry L. Smith 
Charleston, W. Va. 

Robert M. Smith 
Skokie, 111. 




AtM 



Why spend a dime, let Loretto call. 



Reference work for Soc. 20. 



Ziegfield Follies 




Page 87 




freshmen 




Denis E. Starbuck 
Brighton, Colo. 

Richard L. Steele 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert O. Stewart 
Los Alamos, N. M. 



Thomas B. Stewart 
Arvada, Colo. 

David Switzer 
St. Louis, Mo. 

James F. Tainter 
Roek Hill, Mo. 



Robert M. Tapp 
Denver, Colo. 

Bruce T. Tawson 
Denver, Colo. 

James B. Taylor 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Fred Tenderich 
Denver, Colo. 

George A. Theisen 
Denver, Colo. 

David F. Thompson 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 88 



Frank J. Tobin 
Mitchell, So. Dak. 

David J. Toepfer 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas Tracy 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 



John A. Trenkle 
Denver, Colo. 

Douglas F. Vap 
McCook, Nebr. 

Robert E. Vescovo 
Kirkwood, Mo. 



David A. Visnaw 
Webster Grover, Mo. 

Robert C. Volkert 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph H. Ware 
Denver, Colo. 




Now you see it, now you don't. 



Daydreaming about date Friday night. 



Jeckeis in the making. 





fresh 



men 




/ 



David M. Warner 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael V. Wells 
Los Alamos, N. M. 

Lawrence E. Welte 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Richard D. Weskamp 
Denver, Colo. 

Andrew K. Williams 
Charleston, W. Va. 

Arthur N. Wise 
Platteville, Colo. 



James F. Yax 
Lincoln, Nebr. 

Albert E. Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 

Ernest P. Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 






A 



Page 90 



in memonam 



/ ' \ 



(f '■■■*> ..,;:■■.■:-■■■■■■■■■■'■ 



7 



Rev. Joseph A. Ryan, S.J. 



/ whirled out wings that spell 
And fled with a fling of the heart to the 
heart of the Host. 

—Hopkins 

To the "heart of the Host" went a man on November 14, 1957, one 
more who had fought the good fight and then had gone to claim his 
reward. To this man, one cannot help but think, the meeting with the 
Heart was not a fearful experience but a pleasant, long-awaited one. 

What manner of man was this that he might approach the throne with- 
out fear? He was a little man, but big-hearted; he was a well known 
man, but humble. He was an intelligent man, but simple; he was a 
businessman, but saintly. He started and directed a business school. 
He steered students into a competitive world fraught with danger. He 
counselled men engaged in mundane financial pursuits. But he was, 
first, last, and always, a priest — a Jesuit priest. He imbued his students 
with a spirit of sacrifice and godliness that they might carry into that 
competitive world the truth of God. He saw to it that there emerged 
from his school not men of good business but good men of business. 

He is missed by those left behind, but his friends, and they are legion, 
cannot sorrow over his departure but rather, they are joyful that to 
the "heart of the Host" has gone the Reverend Joseph A. Ryan, S. J. 



Page 91 




AWARDS 



Pace 92 




Most Reverend Bernard J. Sullivan, S.J. 
Reverend Mark S. Gross, S.J. 




golden 
years 

of 



service 



On the occasion of their golden jubilees in the 
Society of Jesus, the RANGER salutes The Most Rev- 
erend Rernard J. Sullivan, S. J., M.A., LL.D., D.D., and 
the Reverend Mark S. Gross, S. J., M.A. The Bishop, a 
graduate of Regis College, served in the missions in 
India and, at the call of the Holy Father, became the 
Ordinary of the Diocese of Patna, India. Retiring from 
his episcopal duties, Bishop Sullivan, now Titular 
Rishop of Halicarnassus, assumed teaching duties at 
Regis where he is an Assistant Professor of English 
and Theology. 

A graduate of the University of Detroit, Father 
Gross, an outstanding athlete in his collegiate days, 
has served long and faithfully in the English and 
Theology department at Regis where he is an Associate 
Professor. The congratulations and well-deserved grati- 
tude of the many students whom they have so patiently 
counselled are but a small tribute to these men on this 
commemoration of their golden years of service to their 
colleagues, their students, and their God. 



Page 94 




outstanding 
achievement 



For outstanding achievement in his profession by an 
alumnus, His Excellency Stephen L. R. McNichols, 
Governor of the State of Colorado, was awarded a silver 
spur trophy at the first annual awards banquet at Regis. 
The governor, class of '36, graduated cum laude with a 
Bachelor of Philosophy degree. After receiving his 
Bachelor of Laws degree from Catholic University in 
Washington, he served with the F. B. I. and then with 
the navy during World War II. He returned to civilian 
life as a partner in the law firm of McNichols, Dunn, 
and Nevans. After eight years in the Colorado House 
of Representatives, he was elected Lieutenant Gover- 
nor in 1956 and, in 1957, he achieved the highest office 
of the state, the governship. Regis College is justifia- 
bly proud of this distinguished RANGER. 



Hon.Stephen I.R. McNichols 



John Bruggeman, Rev. Charles F. Kruger, S.J., Paul Horan 




debate 
honors 



Competing against the top Jesuit colleges and 
universities in the United States and Canada at the 
Jesuit Centennial Celebration at Loyola in Chicago, the 
Regis College debate team of John Bruggeman and 
Paul Horan made practically a clean sweep of the 
opposition in their first meet of the season. Losing 
only to Georgetown University, the Regis debaters tied 
for first place on a won-Iost basis with Xavier Univer- 
sity but were awarded second place honors on points. 
The trophy the team brought back with them from 
Chicago is evidence of the growing renown of Regis 
College in the areas of more academic endeavor. 



Pare 95 




brown 
& 

gold 

award 



The BROWN AND GOLD recognized Bill Bollwerk 
for his many and varied achievements by singling him 
out as "outstanding senior" and recipient of the annual 
BROWN AND GOLD award. Bill rightfully takes his 
place amongst die select number of previous illustrious 
recipients of this award, adding his own lustre to diis 
choice group of past leaders of Regis College. As 
runners-up for the honor, the BROWN and GOLD also 
recognized two other seniors who have contributed 
much of themselves to the betterment of the college: 
Ray Nass and Sam O'Neal. 



william bollwerk 

eugene o'neal 



raymond nass 





Page 96 




a. k. psi 

d 



awar 



The Alpha Kappa Psi "Man of the Year" award to 
an alumnus for outstanding contributions to his profes- 
sion was conferred on the Honorable Edward C. Day, 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of Colorado. 
Judge Day received his degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Regis College in the class of 1930, after having 
served as president of the student council. An outstand- 
ing member of the legal profession, the judge was the 
logical choice of the electorate to serve on the District 
Bench. In 1957 he was elected to his present position 
on the Supreme Court, to serve for ten years. Another 
example of the type of leader produced by Regis, Judge 
Day is an honor to his profession and to his school. 



Honorable Edward C Day 



John Gatens 




gleason 

memorial 

award 



Awarded by Alpha Delta Gamma each year in 
recognition of prowess in athletics and scholarship, the 
John Gleason Memorial award, as well as an additional 
award as outstanding leader in basketball, went to 
John "Rebel" Gatens, senior from Charleston, West 
Virginia. The scrappy, six foot, four year letterman 
ended a remarkable career on the courts as captain 
of the Ranger quintet this year. A triple threat in high 
school, the Rebel took All-State honors in football, 
basketball, and baseball. At Regis he concentrated on 
basketball, acting as floor general his senior year and 
all-around sparkplug, firing the team with his seemingly 
boundless energy and enthusiasm. In addition to his 
outstanding accomplishments on the hardwood courts, 
Johnny blossomed forth each spring as a baseball 
pitcher with noteworthy speed and control. One half 
of the Gatens-Boone guard combination, as outstanding 
a combo as has graced any basketball roster, Johnny's 
ability and indomitable will to win, his drive, spirit, 
and determination will be sorely missed and difficult 
to replace in the years ahead without him. 



Page 97 



w 



h 



o's 



h 



wno 



In recognition of outstanding achievement in aca- 
demic and extra-curricular activities, of leadership in 
student affairs, and of service to the college, fifteen 
seniors were elected this year to the 1957-58 edition of 
WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 



Selected by a general vote of the faculty, these men 
were chosen because they exemplify the highest ideals 
of young Catholic manhood. Because of this award 
these men are particularly expected to live up to those 
ideals and to cany into a world, sometimes less than 
Christian, an intense fervor for morality and truth. 



sid blubaugh 

wichita, kan. 



During his four years at Regis, Sid has carried over a 
3.00 average in his pre-medical studies. He also has 
been noted for his work in the Regis Publicity Office. 
Last year he was elected by the student body to a 
director spot on the Executive Board of the Regis Stu- 
dent Council. Sid has served as the head of the cheer- 
leaders for the last four years. In his sophomore year 
he was chosen by the biology department to serve as 
a student instructor in biology. He was also a student 
prefect in Carroll Hall during his junior year. 



Page 98 




william bollwerk 

university city, mo. 



Bill will be remembered by the Regis student body 
for many years as the man most instrumental in the 
passing of the new Regis Student Senate Constitution. 
A history major in the pre-legal field Bill was chosen 
by the student body as President of the Executive 
Board of the Student Council. He was also chosen by 
his class as Freshman President in 1954 and Vice-Presi- 
dent of his Junior Class. In addition to administrative 
duties, Bill is a four year letterman in basketball and 
a staff member of the BROWN & GOLD. 





donald champeau 

leadville, colo. 



Don is an accounting major who entered Regis in 
1952 and spent two years in Mt. Carmel College be- 
fore returning to Regis to finish his college studies. In 
1955 Don was elected to the post of Treasurer of the 
Regis Student Council. He is also a member of Alpha 
Kappa Psi National Business and Professional Fra- 
ternity. Active in the Ski Club and St. John Berchmans 
Society, Don was a member of the college ski team 
his first two years. 



Page 99 




henry close 

wilmette, ill. 



The editor of the student newspaper, the BROWN 
& GOLD, during his senior year, Hank is a philosophy 
major. He served in the capacity of Senior Editor of 
the 1958 RANGER and Sports Editor of the 1956 
RANGER. Elected to the post of Student Council Al- 
ternate by his classmates in Senior year, Hank is a 
member of the philosophical society, the Aquinas 
Academy, and co-chairman of the 1958 Homecomine. 



Joseph cummings 

denver, colo. 



Joe is a history major and was elected by his class- 
mates as Student Council Representative from the 
Senior Class. President of the Denver Club and Vice- 
President of the Dramatics Club, Joe was one of the 
men instrumental in the rebirth of the History Club 
on campus. Joe was dance committee co-chairman for 
the 1958 Homecoming. 










Page 100 



warren hartenbach 



ladue, mo. 



A major in English, Warren has served as head pre- 
fect in O'Connell Hall during his senior year and has 
held the post of Secretary of Circle K International 
the same year. He was also a staff member of the 1955 
RANGER and a director of publicity for the Sodality 
1956-57. 






Joseph hawley 

denver, colo. 



Joe is a business administration major, a veteran of 
the Korean conflict, and a Future Teacher of America. 
A member of Alpha Kappa Psi National Business and 
Professional Fraternity, Joe has been active in the 
chapter functions. He has also served in the Vet's 
Club and the Future Teachers of America. 



Page 101 





george 



lutito 



denver, colo. 



President of the Gamma Sigma Sigma chapter of 
Alpha Kappa Psi, National Business and Professional 
Fraternity, George has served in many executive capac- 
ities while at Regis. He was elected by the student body 
to the post of Treasurer of the Executive Board of 
the Regis Student Council in 1957. Besides his position 
on the Student Council, George is a veteran and has 
served as Treasurer of the Vet's Club during his senior 
year, and as Vice-President of the Italian Club in his 
junior year. George is a business student majoring in 
economics. 



raymond nass 



Plymouth, ill. 



One of the most active seniors at Regis, Ray has held 
a great number of offices. He was elected by the stu- 
dent body to the Executive Board of the Student 
Council and was elected fraternity President by the 
members of Iota chapter of Alpha Delta Gamma Na- 
tional Catholic Society Fraternity. Sports Editor of 
the BROWN & GOLD and business manager of the 
RANGER tell only some of Ray's versatility. He is an 
English major and a Dean's List Student, a member of 
the 'R' Club and a letterman in both basketball and 
baseball. 





Page 102 



eugene o'neal 

university city, mo. 



As editor of this year's RANGER, Sam has shown 
that he has the ability to accomplish almost impossible 
tasks under pressure. A math major, he assumed the 
editorship of the 1957 Ranger with only three weeks 
left in the school year. In 1954 and 1955 he was voted 
to the post of Secretary of the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes. President of the Ski Club, Prefect of the 
Sodality, and a member of the Spanish Club, Sam 
was the driving force behind the 1958 Homecoming, 
as one of the co-chairmen. 





f*0 





james raine 

leadville, colo. 



Manager and organizer of the present Regis pep 
band, Jim has proved himself in many phases of campus 
life. He was Vice-President of the Gamma Sigma 
Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, National Business and 
Professional Fraternity, President of the St. John Berch- 
mans Society, a Future Teacher of America, manager 
of the Regis Snack Bar and newly formed campus 
shop. Jim was elected by his classmates to the post of 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Senior Class. A business ad- 
ministration major, he hopes to enter the field of 
finance after graduation. 




Paee 103 





daniel samide 



denver, colo. 



Dan is an English major and a Dean's List student. 
His judgment was invaluable during his term as 1956- 
57 co-editor of the BROWN & GOLD. He is a member 
of the Glee Club, Literary Club and Debate Society. 
Dan was also the co-founder of the Literary Journal 
in 1957. 



james sena 

denver, colo. 



Vice-President of the Regis student body, President 
of the Literary Club and graduating as an English 
major, Jim has shown his versatility by also being a 
member of the Vet's Club, The Aquinas Academy, a 
Dean's List student, and a columnist for the BROWN 
& GOLD. 




Page 104 



franklin sferra 



denver, colo. 



A history major Frank has served as Editor of the 
1956 RANGER. His activities include Future Teachers 
of America, Italian Club, Dramatics Club, the BROWN 
& GOLD, and the Sodality. Frank has served as Presi- 
dent of the F.T.A. in his senior year, Vice-President of 
the Italian Club for three years, and student manager of 
the Regis Playhouse for three years. He served as 
Homecoming dance chairman in his senior year, and 
was a member of the History Club. 





theodore sermonet 



milwaukee, wis. 



Elected to the post of director of the Executive Board 
of the Student Council, Ted is an economics major. 
He is also a member of Alpha Delta Gamma, National 
Catholic Social Fraternity and held the position of 
pledgemaster in 1957. A three year letterman in varsity 
basketball, Ted was a staff member of the BROWN & 
GOLD for two years. He was voted President of his 
Sophomore and Junior Classes. During his Sophomore 
year Ted served as President of the Milwaukee Club. 



Page 105 




PAUL ROTAR 

Senior 
Mathematics Major 





BENEDICT COSIMI 



Sophomore 
Pre-Medical 



PETER COCOZELLA 



Junior 
English Major 



scholastic achievement 



KENNETH JOULE 

Freshman 
Business Major 




Scholastic Achievement Awards were presented at 
the awards Banquet to these men who had the highest 
overall scholastic averages in their respective classes. 
Paul Rotar was given the award for a 3.8 average, 
Peter Cocozzella received it for a 3.7 average, Benedict 
Cosimi merited the award with a 3.9 average, and 
Robert Pipkin and Kenneth Joule each received awards 
with 4.0 point averages. Pipkin also received an award 
from the American Chemical Society for being the out- 
standing freshman chemistry student. 



ROBERT PIPKIN 

Freshman 
Chemistry Major 







outstanding 
men of regis 



mmm 




Outstanding leadership awards were presented for 
the first time at the Awards Banquet to seniors and 
underclassmen in recognition for their achievements 
and contributions to the college. 

Charles McCarthy, the newly elected president of 
the Student Senate, was the first man to receive this 
newly instituted award. This leader has been a class 
officer in the Junior class and very active in his frater- 
nity Alpha Delta Gamma and the St. John Berchman 
Society, to single out a few of his many activities. 

Terry Sheehy, another new member of the Student 
Senate and former class officer, is well-known for his 
ability as a basketball player and campus leader. 

Thomas Dean, director of the Student Senate, has 
been active in the school radio station and on the 
BANGEB. 

Gene Cavaliere, the vice president of the Student 
Senate, also is the president of the Veteran's Club and 
perennial member of the Dean's List. 



Larry Brady, junior class officer, was one of the 
co-chairman of the Awards Banquet. 

Frank Cambria, president of the Senior Class, was 
Secretary of Alpha Delta Gamma and chairman of the 
Homecoming. 

Bon Hermes, vice-president of Alpha Delta Gamma, 
was co-ordinator of the basketball migration and 
advertising manager of the BANGEB. 

Philip Sharkey was the author of the Student Con- 
stitution and director of the Student Senate. 

Begis Malloy is the treasurer of the Student Senate, 
President of Circle K, director of the Begis Glee Club, 
and member of the BANGEB staff. 

James O'Connor is the assistant editor of the 
BANGEB and active member in the Literary Club, Ski 
Club and other campus organizations. 



Page 107 



f 




i 



JIM O'CONNOR, as the man behind the edi- 
tor of the RANGER in the capacity of 
Assistant Editor, collected all the hapless and 
thankless jobs which go with putting out an 
annual. Because an editor can't work alone, 
much of the credit for this book belongs to 
Jim. 



RON HERMES, who through his boundless 
energy, made the first all-school basketball 
trip to Colorado State University a huge 
success, also merits award for bringing to a 
resounding conclusion the drive for advertis- 
ing to pay for the 1958 edition of the 
RANGER. 



TOM DEAN, college artist and master 
of ceremonies supreme, has filled in on 
numerous occasions to give impromptu 
speeches, and has saved many events 
from failure with his wit and personality. 
Whenever there is a speech or comedy 
skit to be given, Tom is there to give it. 



the ranger calls 



TERRY WELSH took care of the debit and 
credit side of the 1958 RANGER, and 
balanced the books to meet the cost of addi- 
tional pages and an improved cover design, 
and still made sure that the finances were in 
the black when the book finally went to 
press. 



LARRY BRADY and JOE CHASE combined 
as chairmen of the first annual Awards Ban- 
quet and overcame m any difficulties in 
establishing a precedent for classes of the 
future to follow. It is through their work that 
Regis will have a method of honoring out- 
standing students. 



PHIL SHARKEY almost singlehandedly 
undertook the rewriting of an improved 
Student Senate Constitution and by-laws. 
It was Phil who drew the mammoth task 
of explaining the Constitution to the 
entire student body. His efforts were 
well rewarded when it was overwhelm- 
ingly passed by the students. 



Eai 



ai. 



Page 108 





rERRY SHEEHY, who for two straight 
'ears guided the first thoughts of in- 
:oming Freshmen as chairma n of 
r reshman Initiation, merits award also 
is an outstanding member of the basket- 
>all team and as one of the men respon- 
ible for the success of the 1958 Prom. 



FRANK CAMBRIA, as P r e s i d e n t of the 
Senior Class undertook the Herculean task 
of arranging all the festivities of the first 
annual Regis Homecoming. It was due to 
his untiring efforts that the Homecoming 
dance at Wolhurst Country Club was the 
most successful in Regis history. 



CHARLIE MCCARTHY, the financial 
wizard of Alpha Delta Gamma, undertook 
the handling of finances of the 1958 Home- 
coming festivities. It is due to his mastery of 
financial situations that the Homecoming as 
well as the 1958 Junior-Senior Prom were 
financial successes. 



to your attention 



iLAIR FARRELL, merits your attention 
is the driving force behind the Regis 
ladio Station, KREG. Blair arranged 
chedules, secured finances and put the 
tation in a stable position with improved 
■quipment and the largest listening 
ludience in KREG history. 



DAVE SPREHE and JIM CREAMER, who 
served in the capacities of Assistant Editor 
and News Editor respectively on the Regis 
newspaper, the BROWN AND GOLD, were 
the two men without whose help and untir- 
ing effort there would have been no issues 
of the BROWN AND GOLD. 



REGIS MALLOY, with his undying spirit of 
generosity and willingness to lend a hand in 
all situations, has written most of the com- 
plicated passages of the 1958 RANGER in 
spite of holding an off-campus job and 
organizing the Regis Choir and Glee Club. 




SZ0MRNfc\\\mWII 



Page 109 




QUEENS 



Page 110 



' '"■■! 






m 



'%. i«* 




queen 



o 



f 



regis 




Distinctive blond beauty and a lilting laugh 
marked the 1958 Queen of Regis, Miss Francie Ewing. 
This vivacious blue-eyed blond completely stole the 
hearts of Regis as she combined her charm, beauty and 
personality to perfection. The twenty-one year old 
co-ed from Colorado Woman's College was elected 
Queen of Alpha Kappa Psi Fraternity and went on 
from there to overwhelm Regis and win the coveted 
title. From Bakersfield, California, Francie's major is 
interior decorating. She loves all forms of sports and 
is especially adept at synchronized swimming. Francie 
was escorted by Mr. Larry Brady. 

Each of the finalists in the contest was first chosen 
queen of a club or organization on campus. They were 
presented to the student body at the Presentation Ball 
and later at an assembly on campus. During the month 
between the Presentation Ball and the Coronation Ball 
extensive campaigns were staged by the organizations 
sponsoring the candidates. The campaign ended with 
the Coronation Ball at which Miss Ewing began her 
reign as 1958 Queen of Regis. 



Page 112 








/- 



portrait by Jafay 



ft ancle ewing 



Page 113 






portrait by Jafay 



//// oberlin 

alpha delta gamma 



A vivacious smile, dignified poise and a vibrant 
interest in the world around her are the features which 
made Miss Jill Oberlin the Alpha Delta Gamma Fra- 
ternity Queen and ushered her into the court of the 
Regis Queen. From Wilmette, Illinois and a senior 
dietician at Loretto Heights College, she combined 
her charm and poise to win one of the attendant's spots. 
Jill is a member of Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities, and was selected by the Loretto stu- 
dent body to serve as Mission President. She was es- 
corted by Mr. Robert Jones. 



Page 114 




tosie Sebastian 

sodality attendant 



The refined poise and grace of a professional 
model lend emphasis to the appearence of Miss Rosie 
Sebastian in the court of the Regis Queen. A liberal 
arts major from Loretto Heights College and Park 
Ridge, Illinois, her light brown hair, twinkling eyes, 
unique sense of humor and interest in life have made 
her such a favorite with Regis students that she was 
also elected to the court of the Freshman Sweetheart 
Queen. Rosie was selected as Queen of the Men's 
Sodality, and was escorted by Mr. James Wetzel. 



portrait by Jafay 



Page 115 




mane sena 

vet's club attendant 



Twinkling brown eyes framed by her black hair 
add lustre to Miss Marie Sena's piquant smile and in- 
finite sense of humor. Marie has become a favorite 
with Regis students and her tide of Queen of the Vet's 
Club assured her appearance in the court of the Regis 
Queen. A Loretto Heights College sophomore from 
Denver, she displays her vivacious nature as a Regis 
cheerleader. Marie is an English major and hopes to 
complete her studies toward a master's degree in Eng- 
lish upon graduation. She was escorted by Mr. William 
Roach. 



portrait by Jafay 




Page 116 






*r>% 



portrait by Jafay 



nancy walls 

denver club attendant 



Blue eyes, light brown hair and radiant freshness 
and dignity herald Miss Nancy Walls, Denver Club 
Queen into the court of the Queen of Regis. A Loretto 
Heights College freshman from Denver, Nancy has a 
striking personality, a genuine friendliness and a pol- 
ished sense of poise which have endeared her to Regis 
students. Her pleasing personality gives her a unique 
speaking ability. Nancy is a liberal arts major and 
loves all forms of sports. She was escorted by Mr. 
Frank Sferra. 



Page 117 




ntartka tipton 

sweetheart queen 

The deafening clamor of freshman voices paused 
momentarily as Frank Maggio, President of last year's 
Freshman Class, announced that Miss Martha Tipton 
had been chosen to reign over the Class of 1961 as it 
officially ended the period of initiation with the first 
annual Sweetheart Dance. 

The five candidates, all freshmen at Loretto 
Heights College, were nominated before the traditional 
freshman hike by members of the Regis Sophomore 
Class and were voted on by the freshmen. The girls 
were first presented during classes on campus and 
later during the hike. 

The Sweetheart Dance this year is a new innova- 
tion, replacing the Freshman Frolic, the traditional 
coming-out dance for freshmen. 

The reigning queen, Miss Martha Tipton, is a 
native of Brookville, Missouri. The members of her 
court are Misses Rosie Sebastian, Kiki Donahue, Jane 
Zengler, and Jo Berg. 



1957 

sweetheart 
queen 





Page 118 










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kiki donahue 




Page 119 




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maty tiotdan 



attendants 




glenda scott 



maty tyan 



kay me eabe 



sue lea hey 






Page 120 



oming 
queen 





Vivacious, blue-eyed blond with a "Jersey" twang 
ably describes the 1958 Regis Homecoming Queen, Miss 
Maiy Ann McCluskey. A favorite with Regis students 
throughout her four years at Loretto Heights College, 
Mary Ann completely captivated the alumni and stu- 
dents gathered for the climax of the Homecoming 
Dance, her coronation. Mary Ann is a Senior at Loretto 
Heights from Morristown, New Jersey, and her vibrant 
interest in Regis and in all of life and her willingness 
to lend a helping hand to anyone who needed it make 
Mary Ann a perfect 1958 Homecoming Queen. 

The members of her court are as charming and 
gracious as the Queen herself. Miss Mary Riordan from 
Loretto Heights, Miss Glenda Scott from St. Anthony's 
Nursing Home, Miss Mary Ryan from Loretto Heights, 
Miss Kay McCabe from Mercy Nursing Home and Miss 
Sue Leahey from Loretto Heights form a beautiful 
complement to the Queen and a picturesque bevy of 
beauties for the 1958 Homecoming. 



Pare 121 



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Rev. Fred Daly, SJ. 

Athletic Board Chairman 

Mr. Louis Gachic 




athletic board 



Regis sports fans will be the first to admit that in 
recent years the basketball fortunes of Regis have im- 
proved and that the caliber of play has been enhanced 
to a degree where the Rangers have been able to play 
well against opponents which are classified in the "big 
name" category. 

In the past few seasons Regis has played such 
outstanding opponents as Dayton, Cincinnati, Xavier, 
Seattle, and Oklahoma City to name a few. During 
the past season Seattle was beaten in the final playoffs 
of the NCAA tournaments. Xavier went on to win in 
the NAIA. The Rangers themselves were beaten in the 
NAIA divisional tournament held in Springfield, Mis- 
souri, after winning their first game. 

Behind these successes of Regis teams stand four 
men without whose experience and foresight the solid, 
well-picked schedules for recent seasons would have 
been impossible. Theirs also is the task of specifying 
and applying the rules of ethical sportsmanship and 
Catholic principles to their dealings with opponent 
teams as well as Regis teams of the past, the present, 
and the future. These four men-Father Fred Daly, 
Mr. Louis Gachic, Father Harry Klocker, and Coach 
Harvey Moore have performed their duties often with- 
out due credit or recognition. Theirs is a thankless and 
often tedious job, but they are men who were picked for 
the task. With men such as these controlling the basket- 
ball fortunes of Regis, Ranger followers can look for- 
ward to a plentiful supply of thrills and good basket- 
ball in years to follow. 



Rev. Harry Klocker, S.J. 




Page 124 



ranger coaches 





Harvey Moore 

Head Coach 



Elmer Ripley 

Freshman Coach 



At the end of the 1957-1958 basketball season 
Harvey Moore could look in retrospect upon a job well 
done. When the season began he looked forward with 
grim forebodings upon a seemingly insurmountable 
schedule. As the season progressed it was obvious that 
the patient hours he had spent instructing his men in 
the fundamentals of his intricate play patterns were 
beginning to bear fruit in efficient forms. When the 
final buzzer rang down the curtain at the close of a 
fifth winning season it opened the door to new Ranger 
fortunes for the imminent future. 

However, his job is more than that of being merely 
a gifted cage mentor. His is the work of a teacher; he 
teaches his players to think for themselves, thereby 
preparing them for their job in life. His personality 
itself instills a feeling of friendliness and admiration in 
the students who often spend their idle hours in the 
student center talking to their coach and friend. With 
men such as this in command, Regis is rapidly esta- 
blishing its position alongside other great teams of the 
nation. 



The gods of basketball and good fortune were 
smiling upon the Rangers when Elmer Ripley came to 
Regis. With him came the benefit of more than half a 
century's experience in playing and coaching basketball. 
His name alone symbolizes basketball and good sports- 
manship in such far reaches of the globe as Japan, 
Formosa, Australia, the Philippines, Singapore, Indo- 
nesia, Malaya, and most recently Israel where he 
coached the Olympic team. In the United States he has 
coached championship tea m s at Georgetown, Yale, 
Columbia, Notre Dame, John Carroll, and the United 
States Military Academy at West Point. 

Due to his celebrated ability as a teacher and a 
fundamentalist, the Harlem Globetrotters appointed 
him to the position of coaching their rookies. It is for 
this reason that he has the task of teaching these same 
fundamentals to the freshmen in order that they may 
leam to grasp and apply his aims of unison, swift and 
smooth movement, team harmony, and sportsmanship. 
To accomplish this final end he often stresses Grantland 
Rice's adage, "He cares not if you won or lost, but how 
you played the game." 



Page 125 




CHEERLEADERS 1 957-1 958-Front row: Maryanna Di Janeiro, 
Sheila Ryan, Loretta Coleman. Back row: Don Hall, Jack 
DeWitt, Duane Beal. 



Up, Up, and Away! ! ! 




cheerleaders 



Owing to the fact that the Regis men feel their 
teams are far superior to any others because of sheer 
excellence of playing ability, skill in winning is further 
enhanced by the exuberant school spirit generated in 
the spectators at each game. And this spirit is invariably 
generated by a vivacious and effervescent group known 
as the cheerleaders. 

In years past the Regis cheerleaders have been 
selected from each class of the college and from 
candidates picked from the young ladies of Loretto 
Heights College. They are chosen during the first 
quarter of the school year and continue their efforts 
until the end of the varsity season. 

For the 1957-58 season, Loretto sent as then- 
rabble-rousing representatives Judy Ruchanan, Marie 
Sena, Lorrie Coleman, Shelia Ryan, Sue Leahy and 
Mary Ann Dijenaro. Regis men who led yells for a 
riotous round of games were: Jack DeWitt, Duane 
Real, Don Hall, Deeds Fletcher and Dick Kelly. 

These generators of school spirit journeyed en masse 
with the team to Fort Collins for the first game with 
Colorado State University. They successfully conducted 
a handful of pep rallies before home games, and none 
will forget the rally before the team left for the regional 
playoffs at Springfield, Missouri in March. While the 
Rangers were preparing to emplane for points east, the 
faithful followers of the team invaded the airport with 
cheers, cymbals and bass drum. All useful endeavors 
were halted and efforts on a more frivolous note were 
undertaken, much to the enjoyment of all those at the 
scene. 



R-E-G-l-S 




Page 126 




1957-1958 Rangers— front row: Bob Linnenberger, Harold 
Marcotte, Jim Butler, Jim Moore, Howard Marshall, Terry 
Sheehy. Back row: Harvey Moore (coach), John Gatens, Den- 
nis Boone, Herb Millard, Bill Bollwerk, Ken Williams (mgr.). 



basketball 



SCHEDULE 1957-58 



The starting five. 




Dec. 


5 


Adams State College 


Dec. 
Dec. 


7 
14 


Colorado State University 
South Dakota University 


Dec. 


20 


Western State University 


Dec. 


21 


Western State University j 


Dec. 


28 


Colorado State University 


Dec. 


31 


Xavier University 


Jan. 
Jan. 


3 
4 


Wayne State University 
South Dakota University 


Jan. 


11 


St. Ambrose College 


Jan. 
Jan. 


18 
25 


Pepperdine College 
Oklahoma City University 


Jan. 


29 


St. Mary's of California 


Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 


8 
13 
15 


Wayne State University 
Seattle University 
Portland University 


Feb. 
Feb. 


16 

22 


Portland University 
Adams State College 


Feb. 


24 


Washington U. of St. Louis 


Feb. 
Mar. 


26 
1 


Oklahoma City University 
Air Force Academy 



Page 127 




Marshall takes to the air. 
Boone snags a rebound. 



an amencan 



Dennis Boone, twenty-two point per game scorer 
for the Rangers earned a slot on the Catholic Digest's 
All America starting five. He takes his place alongside 
such greats as Seattle's Elgin Baylor, San Francisco's 
Mike Farmer, Notre Dame's Tom Hawkins, Niagara's 
Alex Ellis, and Don 
Lane of Dayton. 

In addition to being 
Regis' leading scorer, he 
and his running-mate, 
John Gatens, were rec- 
ognized as one of the 
top guard duos in col- 
lege basketball. Dennis' 
sensational scoring over- 
shadowed his abilities as 
a ball control artist, 
backboard luminary 
and assist-maker par ex- 
cellence. As a result, 

fans were quick to label him as not only the Ranger 
star of the year, but as possibly the best athlete ever 
to don the Brown and Gold. 

His name is added to a list of all-time Regis greats 
which includes such past heroes as Mick Shannon, 
"Tiger" Wallace, Bryce Heffley, and Ranger coach 
Harvey Moore. 

The 6'2" star made 441 points against teams that 
were primed to stop him at all costs. "Opponents 
nightmare" was the term sportswriters used to describe 
him. He was named to every opposing team's "all 
opponent" starting five. This athlete, instrumental in 
putting Regis on the basketball map, is only a soph- 
omore. Watch him in the future. 




Ranger firemen wait their turn to douse opposition flames of hope. 




Page 128 



it ii u * M 






*» 



J 




/ 





Loyal fans carry victorious Rangers from the court after win 
over Oklahoma. 



the season in revue 



In the season's opener the Rangers were faced by 
dual foes: injuries and Adams State. However, Jim 
Butler and Harold Marcotte were able to take up the 
slack with little more than two minutes remaining to 
play, thus enabling Regis to eke out a 65-62 win. 

Two days later, on December 7, two-hundred and 
fifty Regis students traveled to Ft. Collins to see the 
Rangers lock horns with the Rams of Colorado State. 
At halftime the Rangers had a nine point lead. Despite 
the twenty-seven points which Boone contributed to 
the Ranger cause, C. S. U. rallied and won 72-60. 

December 14 marked the Ranger's first appearance 
in Denver as they played South Dakota. Regis fans 
were treated to a display of Boone's jump shot as he 
pumped twenty-six points through the nets. Linnen- 



berger netted twenty points which matched his twenty 
rebounds as the Rangers went on to win 74-64. 

December 21 the Rangers travelled to Gunnison 
for the first in a two-game series against Western State. 
Throughout most of the game the Rangers were 
engaged in a seesaw battle. With less than twelve 
minutes remaining Boone and Gatens scored in quick 
succession to break the deadlock. In the 75-67 Ranger 
victory captain John Gatens was high scorer with 
twenty-two points. The next night the Rangers played 
the second game. Boone was high with twenty-six 
points followed by Howard Marshall who connected 
for twenty-one. Linnenberger and Butler each scooped 
the boards for fourteen rebounds as the Rangers 
romped to an easy 99-68 win. 



Page 129 




Ranger action viewed in multiple exposure. 



The next Saturday night marked the occasion for 
the Ranger's return engagement against C. S. U. at the 
Auditorium Arena. C. S. U. never had a chance to 
repeat their earlier victory at Ft. Collins as the entire 
team clicked with precision and accuracy to scorch the 
nets with an amazing sixty-two percent of their field- 
goal attempts. Dennis Boone and Gatens lead the 
scoring with twenty-five and twenty-two points respec- 
tively as both were able to consistently break loose for 
drive-in shots. Linnenberger and Sheehy controlled 
the backboards as each grabbed eleven rebounds. For 
the second time in his basketball career Boone fouled 
out. The "Aroused Rangers" avenged the previous loss 
83-71. 




JOHN GATENS, senior team captain, 
proved to be a threat in scoring and 
ball handling. 



Page 130 



The Rangers spent New Year's Eve in Cincinnati 
where they faced a much taller opponent in the Xavier 
squad. From the opening gun it was obvious that the 
Ranger four game winning streak would be broken. 
Suffering from flu Roone was able to score twenty-three 
points although playing without his usual speed and 
fire. The height of the Xavier squad squelched the 
usual backboard play of Linnenberger, Sheehy, and 
Butler. The team was unable to shoot effectively from 
the field as they connected with a relatively nil thirty- 
two percent accuracy. 

The second game of the three game road trip was 
played in Detroit against Wayne State. In the first half 
John Gatens kept the Rangers within striking distance 
as the half ended with Wayne State ahead by a narrow 
margin of one point. In the second half Howard 
Marshall grabbed fourteen rebounds and the team 
began to function efficiently once again. Boone was 
weak at the free-throw line as he made only two out 
of nine attempts. The rest of the squad compensated 
for this competently as Regis went on to win 67-57 as 
Boone tallied 22 points followed by Gatens with 18. 





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Gatens fights for a rebound. 



Marshall, Bollwerk, and Sheehy fight for ball control. 



Butler and Linnenberger show Pepperdine how Rangers 
rebound. 







Ill 




TERRY SHEEHY, junior center, was a 
mainstay on the boards in addition to 
being the Ranger's top defensive player. 



The last game of the team's eastern road trip was a 
controversial one to say the least. "Home-towners" is a 
perennial bleat of losing basketball teams and its 
echoes reverberated throughout the halls of Regis. 
Regis lost to South Dakota January 4 by a score of 
88-72 amidst a throng of fouls both personal and 
technical. Whatever the consensus of opinion may have 
been in reference to the game's officiating, the im- 
portant fact is that from tins game Regis sprung back 
to an impressive string of victories each of which was 
marked by fine basketball. The South Dakota outcome 
was unfavorable but we of Regis see in that defeat 
another source of tribute to our team, men of deter- 
mination and good sportsmanship who fared well in 
extremely disappointing circumstances. 

One week later, on January 11, the Rangers 
rebounded in spirit from the South Dakota debacle to 
face the St. Ambrose Bees. Shaking off the effects of 
the previous game the Rangers literally tore the Bees 
apart as Jim Moore came off the bench to score twelve 
points in addition to playing a beautiful defensive 
game. 








BILL BOLLWERK, senior guard-forward 
was the hustler and invaluable fireman 
who often proved the difference be- 
tween victory and defeat. 




Boone tries for two against C.S.U. 
Bollwerk battles for loose ball in St. Mary's game. 





BOB UNNENBERGER, junior forward had 
the highest percentage of field goals 
completed throughout the entire coun- 
try. His fierce backboard play paved 
the way for many Ranger victories. 



Linnenberger soars above high-flying Falcon. 




Dennis the Menace flies against Cadets. 




On January 18 the Rangers played host to Pepper- 
dine College at the Auditorium Arena. Boone was high 
man for the team as he turned in an excellent per- 
formance while scoring twenty-eight points. His 
accomplishment was overshadowed by that of Bob 
Linnenberger who made a fantastic eight for eight 
performance from the field and sunk two free throws 
for an eighteen point game. In a roaring finish Boone 
and Gatens scored the last eight points of the game to 
secure a Ranger 83-70 victory. 

Oklahoma City University on January 25 was the 
next guest of the Ranger s. The taller men from 
Oklahoma were heavily favored against the compara- 
tively Lilliputian battlers of Regis. Throughout the 
game the Rangers were on the short end of the scoring 
column. With Boone turning in a relatively poor per- 
formance of twelve points the beleaguered defenders 
were fully taxed as Jim Butler, Bob Linnenberger, and 
Howard Marshall engineered one of the most stirring 
rallies in the annals of Regis sports. In the final fifty- 
seven seconds of the game these three men scored nine 
points to fight toward a Regis victoiy of 78-77. Marshall 
was high-point man with fifteen in the Ranger's finest 
hour as the team was carried from the floor. 



St. Mary's of California paid their visit to Denver 
to greet a flu-ridden squad of Regis men. Linnenberger 
had a bad attack of the flu and had to watch from the 
bench. Jim Butler had been taking penicillin and How- 
ard Marshall had been under a doctor's care with a 
serious throat affliction. These were not enough to 
stop the Rangers as Boone and Gatens scored more than 
half of the points with an aggregate total of thirty- 
seven. Regis won a rather easy game as they emerged 
the victors, 71-59. 

An enjoyable homecoming weekend was the occa- 
sion for a lackluster game against Wayne State on Feb- 
ruary 8. Boone and Linnenberger turned in fine per- 
formances as Boone garnered 22 points and Linnen- 
berger 18 rebounds. Wayne State continually stalled 
to avoid recurrences of the blistering Regis fast-break 
as the Rangers won, 86-51. 



Butler takes possession over Air Force. 





Rangers up in the air for two points. 




JIM BUTLER, junior forward was the 
most improved Ranger starter as he 
proved his value and versatile pre- 
cision beneath the baskets. 



Page 135 




The next game was played on February 13 in 
Seattle in the first of three game series in the Pacific 
Northwest. All of the stories heard abont Seattle's 
fabulous Elgin Baylor proved to be true as lie literally 
smashed the Rangers singlehanded with a dazzling 
forty-seven point performance and a bone-rattling turn 
of duty on the backboards. After the game Coach 
Moore truly said, "Baylor is the greatest college basket- 
ball player I've seen." Boone managed to salvage twen- 
ty-two points in the worst Ranger performance of the 
year as Regis emerged at the bottom of a 99-69 game. 

Two days later the Rangers traveled to Portland for 
the first half of a two-game stand against the Portland 
Pilots. Bob Linnenberger starred for Moore's men with 
twenty-one points and eighteen rebounds. In losing 
89-71, the Rangers came close in only one department, 
that of rebounding. 

The next day the Rangers played their second half 
of the doubleheader. Again they lost, but by a narrow 
margin of five points, 76-71. Boone, in scoring thirty- 
four points made sixteen field goals, one short of the 
school's record. Linnenberger was runner-up with ten 
points. 



Rangers display winning floor game. 



Boone drives against Wayne State. 



Rangers batter Adams State on backboards. 







Sheehy and Butler up for rebound as Bollwerk waits. 



Boone and Sheehy sweep boards. 




DENNIS BOONE, high-scoring sopho- 
more, led Ranger scorers with a 22 point 
per game average throughout season. 




Page 137 




Butler grounds Falcon. 



th 



e scores 



February 22 marked the night of the only game of 
the year played in the Regis gymnasium as the bat- 
tered Rangers returned from their disastrous road trip 
which saw Regis fortunes at their lowest ebb. This 
was to be the second game against Adams State, a 
team which they had beaten earlier. 

Washington's birthday must have been Boone's 
birthday as he had the best night of his collegiate 
career in scoring forty-one points, one short of the 
school record. His point total set the record for the 
Regis gym which also saw Bob Linnenberger play his 
best game as a Ranger. He patrolled both boards and 
was instrumental in establishing the Ranger 84-71 vic- 
tory. At one time the Rangers were twenty-one points 
ahead and were never in danger of having their lead 
challenged. 

Two days later the Rangers appeared in St. Louis 
for their game against Washington University's Bears. 
Several Regis students flew to St. Louis for the game. 
They were sorely disappointed as the Rangers who 
were looking forward to their next game with Okla- 
homa City University were caught completely off 
guard. Only John Gatens was able to give a creditable 
performance as he was able to score twenty-one points 
in an otherwise sloppily played game. 

On February 26 the Rangers arrived in Oklahoma 
City for their second game against the Chieftains. The 
Regis quint was able to hold its own on the score- 
cards until top rebounder, Bob Linnenberger, was 



RC 


65 


Adams State 


62 


RC 


60 


Colorado State 


72 


RC 


74 


South Dakota 


64 


RC 


75 


Western State 


67 


RC 


99 


Western State 


68 


RC 


83 


Colorado State 


71 


RC 


66 


Xavier 


86 


RC 


67 


Wayne State 


57 


RC 


72 


South Dakota 


88 


RC 


87 


St. Ambrose 


63 


RC 


83 


Pepperdine 


70 


RC 


78 


Oklahoma City 


77 


RC 


75 


St. Mary's 


59 


RC 


86 


Wayne State 


51 


RC 


69 


Seattle 


99 


RC 


71 


Portland 


89 


RC 


71 


Portland 


76 


RC 


84 


Adams State 


71 


RC 


68 


Washington (St. Louis) 


77 


RC 


69 


Oklahoma City 


84 


RC 


80 


Air Force Academy 


66 



Butler shakes hands with unseen opponent. 




Page 138 




HOWARD MARSHALL, junior transfer 
student, used his junior college experi- 
ence and rebounding ability to come 
from the bench for the Ranger cause 
many times. 



struck above the eye by an elbow. Early in the first 
half he was taken out of the game to be given four 
stitches. When this happened the Rangers lost most of 
their backboard strength. Late in the second half Lin- 
nenberger returned to action to help the Regis quint 
fight back from a thirty-point deficit to narrow the 
Chiefs' lead to fifteen. Bob returned too late, however, 
as the clock ran out on the Mooremen and the Chiefs 
won, 84-69. 

The Rangers returned to Denver for their final game 
of the season against the Air Force Academy's Falcons. 
Both teams were keyed-up for their final game of the 
season which was to see the Falcons' high scoring Bob 
Beckel meet the Rangers' Dennis Boone. Ranger fans 
and Ranger athletes both looked forward to the best 
and hardest played game of the season. They were 
not to be denied as both teams fought bitterly. Boone 
outscored Beckel twenty-one to seventeen as the Ran- 
gers hit sixty per cent of their field-goal attempts. The 
Rangers displayed outstanding defensive play and over- 
whelming backboard superiority as Terry Sheehy, Jim 
Butler, and Bob Linnenberger, the three backboard 
powers, stifled the high-flying Falcons. Linnenberger 
made eighteen points and Butler played a precision 
game beneath the backboards to score fourteen points. 
The two senior members of the team, Bill Bollwerk and 
Ranger captain John Gatens, each added ten points to 
the Ranger victory, 80-66. Ranger fans could look back 
with pride upon a record of thirteen wins against eight 
defeats in regular season play. 



Harold Marcotte, forward 



Herb Millard, guard 



Jim Moore, center 




Page 139 



junior 
varsity 



Under the tutelage of Elmer Ripley the Regis 
Junior Varsity, although posting a poor 4-11 season, 
gave notice that a few varsity prospects were on the 
roster. 

An abundance of playing time was the order of 
the day for each aspiring young athlete. Ripley organ- 
ized, and put to infinite use a two-platoon system in 
which the men on scholarships started each game, 
played the first ten minutes or so, then warmed the 
bench until the final minutes of the ball game. During 
the interim, fascinated spectators were treated to a 
madly-whirling, fast breaking streak of lightning brand 
of ball, rigorously staged by the "dash men." 

The season opened with a loss to Lowry Air Force 
Base, 75-70. The team then overcame early season 
jitters, polished off some of the rough edges and jelled 
long enough to down Adams State in a closely fought 
contest, 64-62. Larry Delmargo hit two clutch charity 
tosses to insure the victory. High point men were Tom 
Hitzelberger and Delmargo with twenty-one and eight- 
een points respectively. 

In the next three contests, Regis aced two, both 
victories coming against junior colleges, and both in 
overtime play. Northeastern fell by an 80-76 count. 
Trinidad, showing more fight, caused a few beaded 
brows before the Juniors Rangers nailed down the 
door, 78-77. 




Bob Smith— star of the future? 



1957-1958 JUNIOR VARSITY-Front row: John Crubaugh, 
Jack Bailey, John Berger, George Miller— Manager. Back 
row: Mike Christopher, Larry Del Margo, Tom Hitzelberger, 
Jerry Smith. 




%®E@ 



1 




Smith, Schroer, and Coach Ripley after practice. 




Lone Ranger demasked by group of Frederick Falcons. 



Schroer and Berger chase loose ball. 




Ten more games now remained on the anything but 
pushover schedule. Although they won only one of 
these games, undermining the "orediggers" of Colorado 
Mines, 64-53, the Jayvees didn't roll over and play dead. 
Coach Ripley considered individual experience to be 
more important than all out concentration on the win 
and loss columns. 

The brand of play he directs is built upon a run-and- 
pass type offense and a "man for man" defense. Namely 
it is the "eastern" type of basketball. 

Hit and miss shooting from anywhere and at any 
time holds no place on a Ripley-coached team. In his 
mind, the primary aim on a junior varsity is to develop 
the player, and the player who best conforms to the 
pattern which he advocates will and does pound the 
boards more than the "gunner" or a player who aban- 
dons the fundamentals in pursuit of other aspects of 
the game. Individual attention plus constant emphasis 
upon fundamentals, passes, "picks", and basic move- 
ments do not necessarily insure a steady string of vic- 
tories, as anyone can obviously see by the record, but 
they do and have developed varsity material. Although 
they lost both games to the high-flying "Freddy Fal- 
cons" of the Air Force Academy, the future varsity stal- 
warts in these two games showed excellent potential. 



Page 141 




Haushaulter fires from outcourt. 



Delmargo and Hitzelberger are two of the best J. V. 
players that Regis has seen in recent years. "Turkey" 
Schroer, 6'5" forward from Nebraska, is a deadly corner 
shooter. Jerry "Hatchet" Smith rebounds with the best 
of them and could break through as a high-point man 
with the varsity. Jerry Haushaulter and Mike Christo- 
pher round out the rest of the bigger men. 

The "dash men" are Crubaugh, Bailey, Berger, Bob 
Smith, and Gatens. Crubaugh and Bailey are "stop on 
a dime" kind of ballplayers. Both can hit from the out- 
side. Berger, a good all-around ball player, shows good 
savvy and hustle. Smith, a polished, smooth-moving 
forward, was the team's "dark horse" and shows a great 
deal of potential. Gatens, a tough, spirited guard, was 
the team's "holler guy". 

By alternating players in the two-platoon system, 
Ripley has been able to determine the most effective 
group of men and has tried to teach them most of the 
teachable knowledge and benefits of his experience. 
His is a thankless and unpublicized job. When the team 
wins, the players are given credit; if they lose, the coach 
is blamed. 

Considering the players' development this year, 
don't be surprised to see any one of these Ranger Jay- 
vees in a varsity uniform before the next season is fin- 
ished. 



"Hooker" Delmargo thwarts NJC. 



"Dash men' 
opponents. 



plus scholarship men batter wea 



T 






Smith and Hitzelberger double-team Northeastern. 



Bailey waits for rebound in varsity scrimmage. 





the scores 



RC 


70 


Lowry AFR 


75 


RC 


64 


Adams State 


62 


RC 


80 


Northeastern JC 


76 


RC 


44 


Pueblo JC 


93 


RC 


78 


Trinidad JC 


77 


RC 


64 


Lowry AFB 


75 


RC 


60 


Colorado State College 


73 i 


RC 


64 


Colorado Mines 


53 


RC 


66 


Trinidad JC 


88 


RC 


69 


Colorado State College 


94 


j RC 


71 


Northeastern JC 


79 


RC 


58 


Colorado Mines 


70 


RC 


47 


Air Force Academy 


68 


RC 


65 


Adams State 


78 


RC 


58 


Air Force Academy 


62 



Page 143 




O'Grady and Callender 



Mike Kennedy 



Jim Machinot 



GOLF TEAM, 1 957-1 958-Front row: Fred Erskine, Charlie 
Danchersten, Jim Machinot, Ted Hart (coach). Back row: Joe 
Meningus (assistant coach), Fred Scott, George Park, Mike 
Kennedy, Mike Williams, Dick O'Grady, Leigh Callender. 




Page 144 




golf teem 



Ted Hart, a local professional golfer and owner 
of the Golfland at 50th and Federal, took on tire job 
this year as coach of the Regis College Golf Team. 
Mr. Hart offered to the members of the golf team and 
any other student of the college a special discount at 
his establishment and kindly offered to assist the team 
in their training and competition. 

The members of the golf team this year were 
Mike Kennedy, George Park, Ray Meyer, Jim Obst, 
Frank Maggio, Jim Machinot, Leigh Collender, and 
Charlie Danchesten. 

This year's team, captained by Mike Kennedy and 
George Park, began its season in March and undertook 
their practices on Willis Case Municipal Golf Course 
and at the Lakewood Country Club. 

Intramural golf drew many more interested players 
but didn't offer the stiff competition that the varsity 
players were forced to face. 



George Park 
Golf team at Golf Land. 



Co-captains Kennedy and Park line up a putt. 




Page 145 



•n 



tennis 



"Anyone for tennis?" Yes, this sport is one of the 
most popular on the college campus during the temp- 
erate days of springtime. Regis men flock to the courts 
near Berkeley Lake to engage in arduous practice or 
simply play when the ice melts and the sun begins to 
cast its glow on the netsters. 

The Regis Tennis club, composed of such notables 
as Roger Gubbins, Mike McCue, John Stanko, Deeds 
Fletcher, and Ted Foti convene with their moderator, 
Father Cervantes (a tennis player of local repute) in 
the middle of March, weather permitting. 

The group "scrimmages" with local opponents and, 
in years past, the club has made an excellent showing 
in the competition they have undertaken thusfar. 

Intramural tennis draws many more aspirants to 
the courts in order that they may be able to qualify for 
the club's team. 



Mike Mayer 





Deeds Fletcher serves to opponent. 
McCue returns to back court. 



X&* ** 










Page 146 




Rog Gubbins 



Ted Foti 



Mike McCue 



TENNIS CLUB, 1 957-1 958-Front row: Clem Frank, Jim Ca- 
bella, Doug Vapp, Pat O'Neill, Bill Schafer, Dennis Ken- 
nedy. Back row: Rog Gubbins, Dennis Marx, Bob Britt, Tom 
Schneider, Deeds Fletcher, Louis Kosednar, Mike Mayer, Jerry 
Morrisson. 




Page 147 





Geary rests after schuss. 



Robison at first gate. 



Rohrer begins downhill. 



SKI TEAM: John Geary, Mike Wilson, Leo Robison, Rohn 
Herrick, Mike Wanebo, Ken Babbitt, Dick Rohrer. 




Page 148 




ski team 



Practice sessions and individual competition were 
the orders of the day for the men of the Ski Rangers. 
Crippled by the loss of three of last years lettermen, 
the ski team focused its attention on the hopes for 
next year's season. Rohn Herrick, team captain and 
top point-man, was forced to carry much of the load 
and responsibility connected with the jobs of captain, 
coach, trainer, and equipment repairman. 

Two freshmen, Leo Robison and John Geary, 
showed much potential for future Ranger fortunes as 
they established their positions as all-event stars. Mike 
Wanebo and Ken Babbitt were specialists in downhill 
and slalom competition. Dick Rohrer and Mike Wilson 
showed endurance, spirit, and new techniques in their 
roles as cross-country skiers. 

In their first meet of the year, the Rangers finished 
second in a meet with Camp Hale, Colorado Mines, and 
the Air Force Academy. 



Rohn Herrick, one of Colorado's top skiers, was the big factor in 
Ranger skiing as he was instrumental in Ranger successes. 



Herrick schusses the Bash at Winter Park. 




Wilson Christies to a stop. 







Page 149 




Chris O'Donnell practices before races. 



Many of the more ardent Regis skiing enthusiasts 
braved the driving snowstorm and the icy roads of 
Loveland Pass to enter the intramural ski meet held 
at the Arapahoe Basin ski area. Due to the inclement 
elements it was feared that the meet might not be held, 
but at the insistence of those who had the "ski-fever" 
the meet was held as scheduled. All events were open 
to members of the novice, intermediate, and expert 
classes. 

By far the most popular class was the novice where 
George Park edged Frank Maggio and Bob Britt who 
was forced to finish the downhill race with a broken 
ski. In the intermediate competition Mike Bricker had 
relatively little competition as he won each event hands 
down. The events in the expert class narrowed down 
to a three man race in the downhill. Jim O'Connor's 
chances were erased when one of his bindings loosened. 
Sam O'Neal and Nick Baldwin split honors at the end 
of the day as O'Neal took first in the downhill and 
Baldwin placed first in the slalom. 



Would-be champions wax skies before races. 



intramural 
skiing 




Baldwin schusses Molly Hogan. 





Park rides tow to the starting line. 



interclass 
Softball 





Bollwerk's power versus LaBelle's magic. 




Fletcher goes down on calls. 



Fine pitching from veteran monndsman, Mel La- 
Belle, boosted the sophomores into the interclass soft- 
ball championship. Throughout the tournament, La- 
Belle's speed and pitching finesse kept the sophs hot 
contenders for the crown. 

In the first contest of the double elimination tourna- 
ment, the seniors were edged, 8-7, in a wild contest 
with the frosh. Meanwhile, the sophomores canned a 
junior squad, 5-1. 

The seniors then shaped up as they dumped the 
frosh, 12-8 and erased the junior's hopes, 10-3. 

Playing good ball, the sophs kept pace with La- 
Belle, downing the frosh, 9-3 and the juniors, 5-3. 

In the finals between the seniors and sophs, the 
upperclassmen jumped to a two run lead in the first 
inning. The sophs then evened the score in the fourth, 
both runs being the result of costly senior errors. Then, 
in the twelfth inning, the upperclassmen hustled a bit 
more than in the previous innings. Putting together 
three solid pokes, they pushed across two runs which 
proved to be the margin of victory, 4-2. 



Senior coach Cambria plots possible plan. 



Delmargo fans Schafer. 




intramural 
football 



It was flag day every afternoon for several weeks, 
early last fall, as the Regis College Intramural Football 
League broke into full swing. 

This year there were only six teams competing for 
the highly coveted I.M. Football trophy, but the quality 
of the teams was much improved on the whole. They 
were faster, bigger, and more alert in general, as well 
they had to be, for the type of game was a new and 
much more difficult one as compared to last year's 
touch game. 

This year new rides governed the six-man game. 
The biggest change, and really the only important one, 
was the transition from one hand touch to a more sav- 
age and dirilling "capture the flag" type of ball. 

Every man who came into a game had to be 
equipped with a length of cloth, which was to be 
"tucked" in at his shirt tail. The object was to grab the 
flag of the ball carrier and when this was accomplished 
the play would terminate. (This was quite beautiful 
in theory. ) 

The six competing teams were the "Vets", the 
"Weird Ones", the "Chi Lo's", the "McLaughlins", the 
"Mo's Boys" and the "Grenadiers". 

Last year the Grenadiers won the title by nipping 
the Mo's Boys, but at the start of the season it appeared 
as though any of the teams could cop the cup. 

One of the dark horse teams, the Chi Lo's, sparked 
by two speedy backs, Irv Sandoval and Manuel Mar- 
tinez, gave notable account of themselves, but never 
quite turned the trick as they finished in third position 
with a 3-2 record. 

The Vets, a big team that looked good on paper, 
never quite caught on to how the game was played. 
"We won the war and that's enough for us", was their 
motto. They finished in the cellar with a 0-5 record. 

Toward the end of the season it was evident that 
the title game would be a repeat between the Grena- 
diers and the Mo's Boys, and so it was. 

On a bitterly cold December afternoon in the "Ran- 
ger Bowl" the two squads lined up before the crowd 
that had flocked in anticipation of the Herculean battle. 
They were not denied. 

There was outstanding play for both teams. Jim 
Wetzel, Jim Kreuger, and Tom Croak led the Grena- 
diers to a 13-0 half-time lead and never let up until they 
emerged in victory, 23-0. For the vanquished, Ray Nass, 
George Park and Ted Sermonet starred. 

This is the second title the Grenadiers have won in 
a row. The Mo's Boys, who graduate this year, had 
won the title for the previous two years. 




That's illegal, Wetz. 



Nass hits receiver. 



iflr 








Page 152 




wm 




Sermonet & Co. rebound against All-Staters. 



McCoy, Kiefer, Schneider, and Donahue dive for loose ball. 



ADG'S— CHAMPIONS: Ray Nass, Mike Kennedy, Ron Hermes, 
John Geraghty, Charlie McCarthy, Ted Sermonet, Jim Ping- 
pank. 






Page 154 




Gubbins and Morrisson stretch. 



ADG'S win division championship against All-Staters. 




intramural 
basketball 



Basketball at Regis did not apply to men of scholar- 
ship fame only, as was proved by the very active partici- 
pation shown in this year's intramural basketball pro- 
gram. 

An all-time record number of teams entered into 
the competition. So many, in fact, that two divisions 
had to be set up, each consisting of eight teams. 

Last year there were also two leagues, but not 
nearly as strong in individual players nor in overall 
league strength. Both the A and the B divisions were 
divided so as to give equal talent to each, the result 
being better overall competition. 

In the upper division the ADG entry loomed as the 
favorite ball club. There was the nucleus of last year's 
team which lost in the finals of the playoff tournament 
returning to the battle. But the most important factor 
in their being favored was Ted Sermonet's being added 
to the roster. Ted, prior to this year, had lettered three 
years on the varsity as a center. 

The Saints, a newcomer to the league, was com- 
posed of mostly freshmen, but from all appearances 
these were exceedingly fine frosh. Ken Williams, who 
is to see a lot of varsity ball next year in the forward 
slot, was responsible for most of their high rating. 

There were several other teams that appeared to 
have an outside chance to win the title such as the 
Brown and Gold, the All-Staters, and the Cyclops. 
However, this chance was slim. 

In the B division the Molecules, defending I.M. 
champs, were picked as favorites in their league. Their 
entire team had returned and, in addition, they had 
picked up some valuable substitutes. Phil Bobber- 
schmidt, voted most valuable I.M. basketballer, along 
with a pair of fancy guards, threatened to make it twice 
in a row to possess the winner's cup. 

The Grenadiers, the same team that won the I.M. 
football crown, looked good enough to make a strong 
title bid but lacked the depth necessary for the long 
campaign. 

The other team that was given a good chance for 
the run for the money was the Hot Shots. Bell, Dunne, 
Seitz, and Mahoney were the big guns on this squad 
which fell in the playoffs. 

When the regular season had ended and the final 
game of the tournament came about, it found the 
A.D.G.'s pitted against the Molecules. 

This proved to be the best played and hardest 
fought game of the season, but in the last three minutes 
of play the Delts pulled away due to a backfiring full 
court press applied by the Molecules. The final score 
was 66-54 as the A.D.G.'s dethroned the champs. 



Page 155 



T 



'■'■<■■:■;■ 

IQllSft 



GH& 



»;' 




ORGANIZATIONS 



Paw 156 




The Rev. Francis Malacek, S.J., moderator of 
the Student Senate, explains the fine points 
of student government. 



student senate 



Bill Bollwerk, President 



Page 158 




The Student Senate, a new form of student govern- 
ment, was formed this year as the student body ap- 
proved a new constitution. This constitution replaced 
the system of club representation with class representa- 
tion in matters open to the vote and approval of the 
student body. 

The entire summer and the early part of the school 
year were devoted to the writing of the new constitu- 
tion. Before the adoption of it in its present form it 
was revised a total of five times. The constitution pro- 
vides the solution to any problem which arises in re- 
spect to student government. 




Jim Sena, Vice-president 



Ray Nass, Secretary 



George Lutito, Treasurer 



Bill Bollwerk has had the task of co-ordinating the 
student affairs of Regis. Since Regis is growing in 
every respect, it is up to Bill to direct student govern- 
mental growth until the Regis Student Senate becomes 
a model of student government. 

As Vice-President Jim Sena's chief duty is to assist 
the President of the Senate in direction of student 
government. The duties of student government are 
manifold and much responsibility for the smooth op- 
eration of the Senate rests with him. 



Ray Nass as Student Senate Secretary has the task 
of handling all governmental correspondence. 

The responsibility of handling and keeping straight 
all Senate financial affairs falls to the Treasurer, George 
Lutito. 

The Directors have the duty to see that all pro- 
grams initiated by the Executive Board are carried 
through. Sid Blubaugh is director of Student Senate 
Publicity; Ted Sermonet works with the athletic board 
co-ordinating the intramural program; and Phil Sharkey 
is Constitutional Committee Chairman for the Senate. 



Sid Blubaugh, Director 



Ted Sermonet, Director 



Phil Sharkey, Director 




PB"» 




Front row: Bill Whelan, Mike Erhard, Pete Loskouski, Dick 
Kelly, Tom Tracy, Ken Babbitt, George Schieferecke, Tom Mc- 
Connell, Jim Wetzel. Second row: Lou Doyle, Tom Griffin, 
Gene Mueller, Ken Blick, Jack Schippers, Leonard DiLisio, Bob 
Merz, Joe Sullivan, Don Nemeth, Joe Ware, Steve Telatnik. 
Back row: Ray Engelhart, Don Dierks, Arno Muench, Bob 
Bruggeman, Bill Brown, Jerry Cullen, Leo Smith, Chris O'Don- 
nell, Mike Roblee, Larry Brady, Joe Chase. 

sodality 



The prime purpose of the Regis Sodality is to in- 
crease the personal sanctity of its members, and there- 
by to develop Catholic leaders fully qualified to assist 
the Church in its apostolic mission. 

The Rev. Harry Klocker, S.J., moderator of the 
Sodality, has moulded the group so that any man who 



is a true sodalist contributes actively to the functions 
of his group. 

An orphan's party in October, catechism classes at 
the State Reformatory, and the direction of an awards 
banquet in the spring are the main corporal activities 
of the Regis Sodality. 



Page 160 



Officers: Carlo Walker, Probation Chairman; Bob Moynihan, 
President of Sodality Union; Sam O'Neal, Prefect; Fr. Klocker, 
Moderator; Elvinio Sandoval, Executive Chairman; Richard 
Kelly, Vice-President; Ken Ash, Secretary-Treasurer. 







Women's Night Sodality— front row: Patricia Otis, Theresa 
Montoya, Mary Berger. Second row: Shirley Van, Pat Houli- 
han, Cathy Montoya, Gerry DeBell, Janette Lloyd. Back row: 
Rose Richardson, Joan Pepper, Florence Smith, Sue Scott, 
Julie Wiesner. 




Page 161 



- 




Front row: George Summers, Barry Dawson, Joe Cummings, 
Larry Springer, Frank Sferra. Back row: Ben Cosimi, John 
Carbone, Bill Gannon, Jim O'Connor, Al Frei, Bill Brady, 
Conrad Adams. 



denver club 



The Denver Club, the largest organization on cam- 
pus, strives toward better boarder-day student co-ordi- 
nation and school spirit throughout the entire student 
body. The club actively gives its support to various 
school-sponsored functions. The social and service 



activities of the club unite the student more closely. 
But more than just being a social organization the 
club is a valuable service organization helping to pro- 
mote school functions. 



Page 165 



Officers: Original President, 
Frank S f e r r a,- Vice-President, 
Barry Dawson; New President, 
Joe Cummings; Secretary-Treas- 
urer, Larry Springer. 




Members— front row: Barry Dawson, Joe Cummings. Second 
row: Mario Mapelli, Jim Creamer, Larry Blackford. Back 
row: Vincent Carbone, Jim O'Connor, Don Vollmer, Bill 
Whelan, Steve Compton. 




Page 163 




Front row: Joe Fabac, Dick Handover. Second row: George 
Meredith, Nick Baldwin, Don Hall, Bernie Bustos, Fred Hules, 
Lee Dunham. Back row: Tom Tracy, Bob Britt, Blair Farrell, 
Dave McCarthy, Tom Hitzelberger, Tom Dean, John Hart- 
meyer, John Foley, Ron Perry, Dick Heil, Tom Harmer, Pat 
Higgins. 



kreg 



ra 



dio 



Established just two years ago, the Regis College 
Radio Station, KREG, under the direction of its moder- 
ator, Mr. Donald Klene, daily brings to the on-campus 
students local, national, and international news, sports, 
music, and campus chatter. Featured interviews with 
faculty members and prominent students help publicize 



administration policies and student activities. 

Under the student leadership of Rlair Farrell, with 
the able assistance of program director John Foley and 
chief engineer Nick Baldwin, KREG shows promise of 
solidifying its position on campus and increasing its 
appeal to its student listeners in the years to come. 



Page 164 



&w. 




Front row: Lee Ragon, Dennis Gallagher, Larry Clinton, Blair 
Farrell, Frank Sferra, Mary Jo Catlett, Bernie O'Neill, Bob 
Lalich. Back row: Father Deeman, S.J. 



regis playhouse 



Giving to talented students an opportunity for 
creative expression through the medium of the presen- 
tation of well-known dramatic productions is the pur- 
pose of the Playhouse. Following a tradition of ex- 
cellence based on such hits as "My Three Angels," "The 



Country Girl," and "Twelve Angry Men," the players, 
under the capable direction of the Rev. A. J. Deeman, 
S. J., founder and moderator of the group, inaugurated, 
with "Dial M For Murder," what proved to be another 
very successful season this year. 



Page 165 



■ 







Upperclassmen— front row: Jim Raine, Don Dierks, Arno 
Muench, Dave Lunt, Fred Hules, Mike Klein, Dennis Gillen, 
Jerry Cullen, Mike Brophy, Father Harris, moderator. Second 
row: Rich Kelly, Lou Doyle, Joe Sullivan, John Stanko, Jim 
Arvidson, Charlie McCarthy, Ray Wilkinson. Back row: Bill 
Kiefer, Tom Croak, D. McCarthy, Ken Babbitt, Bob Britt, Don 
Champeau. 



st. John berchmans 



Performing the often unnoticed but nevertheless 
important function of serving as acolytes at the some 
fifty Masses offered daily on campus is the duty and 
privilege of the members of the St. John Berchmans 
Society. 

Under the direction of the Rev. Walter Harris, 



S. J., moderator, ably assisted by the officers and floor 
captains, the Society helps to advance an important 
spiritual facet of life on the Regis campus. The con- 
sistent, unselfish work of the Society attests to the sense 
of spiritual values possessed by its large membership. 



Pa ire 166 



Officers: Fr. Harris, Moderator; Jim Raine, President; 
Tom Croak, floor captain; Mike Brophy, floor cap- 
tain; John Geary, floor captain; Charlie McCarthy, 
Secretary. 



Freshmen — front row: Mike Mayer, Ted Barth, Jim 
Yax, Tom Linnebur, Bob Vescovo, John Crubaugh, 
Bob Dietz, Lee Dunham, Jim Rauen, Mike Kailing, Pat 
Hanafee, Tom Remington. Back row: Jim Tainter, 
Jim Godfrey, John Geary, Jim Gottschalk, Tom Mc- 
Connell, Dick Heil, John Kosednar, Terry Paoli. 





Page 167 




Front row, left to right: J. Kirby, V. Carbone, K. Joule, G. 
Mueller, L. Dilisio, H. Blum. Back row: P. Cocozella, D. Otera, 
J. Hennessey, A. Durand, D. Samide, R. Malloy, B. Zivic. 




c 



lub 



Providing vocal music, both liturgical and profane, 
is the purpose of the Glee Club and Choir. Still in the 
embryo stage, the organization, under its president, 
Henry Blum, and student director, Regis Malloy, con- 
centrates on liturgical music. It adds to the solemnity 



of such religious functions as the solemn high Mass of 
the Holy Ghost and Forty Hours devotions. 

By appearances at such student activities as pep 
rallies the glee club contributes to the festivity and 
spirit of the student body. 



Page 168 




Front row: Fred Hules, Dick Hilmer, Bernard Bustos, Leo 
Smith. Back row: James Raine, Dick Rohrer, Steve Telatnik, 
Dave McCarthy, Ted Barth. 



rhythm rangers 



Presentation of varied programs of instrumental 
music is the function of the Rhythm Rangers. Under 
the baton of Mr. Lloyd Bowen, assisted by Steve 
Telatnik and James Raine, they provide everything 



from spirited pep music through dreamy pops to formal 
concert arrangements. 

This dedicated group of musicians through its at- 
tention to the aesthetic, adds just one more cultural 
note to the Regis scene. 



Page 169 




Front row: Mario Mappelli, Tom Regan, Lou Caricato, Joe 
Culig, Jim Wetzel, Barry Dawson, Larry Brady. Back row: 
Tom Murphy, Bill Whelan, Don Champeau, Joe Chase, Ray 
Englehart, Ken Babbitt, Tom Pepin, Tom Birdsall, Dick Rohrer, 
Larry Springer, Jerry Shea, E. J. Martinez, Jim Hofsetz. 



alpha kappa psi 



Alpha Kappa Psi, a national business fraternity, 
has as its purpose the promotion of research among its 
members in the fields of commerce, accounting, busi- 
ness administration, and finance. In doing this research, 
the individual welfare of the members is accomplished 
in part. Another facet of their personal welfare is 
brought about in respect to the fact that the men of the 



fraternity have been able to initiate courses leading to 
degrees in business administration. 

The social aspect of college life is also stressed in 
view of the fact that Alpha Kappa Psi sponsors various 
social activities throughout the year, most noteworthy 
of which is the annual Presentation Ball held during 
the early part of the year. 



Paiiu ITo 



Officers: President, George Lu- 
tito; Master of Ritual, Will Clark; 
Secretary, Lou Rotter; Vice- 
President, Jim Raine; Treasurer, 
Mike Dwyer (missing). 




Front row: Dan Jiron, Tom Griffin, Tom DeRochie, George 
Beutner, Paul Doyle, Joe Markey. Back row: Jack Styers, Ed 
Gallegos, Paul Doring, Jim Arvidson, Jim Butler, Gene Muel- 
ler, Bill Meiers, Joe Hawley, Ken Blick, Bob Goetz. 




Page 171 




Front row: President, Regis Malloy; Vice-President, Arno 
Muench; Treasurer, Barry Dawson; Jack Styers, John Robin- 
son. Back row: Mr. Baier, Joe Chase, Dick O'Grady, Dave 
Sprehe. 



© 



international 



Nineteen hundred and fifty-six marked the estab- 
lishment of Circle K International on the Regis campus. 
Circle K is the college branch of Kiwanis International 
whose purpose is to provide an opportunity for leader- 
ship and to furnish an outlet for aggressive and active 
citizenship in American and world affairs. 

This, the newest service organization at Regis, is 



the first such club on the campus of any Catholic col- 
lege or university in the United States. 

It is noteworthy to mention diat this group furnish- 
es an excellent opportunity for personal leadership 
among its members and the fostering of the spirit of 
dedication to the American ideal. 



Page 172 



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Dor naitti had. Id »<r mmi expnsied 
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...Cm 



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A?- (lit- death-bed nlk-irat il must ex-pia - . 

cViL-iinit'J »illi Uut'triiUi it we nt-iiri<liAi hi. 
flis to [Wia'vst. slikti null's tliu lew mctv strait, 
3lcw Dull »ell vhfctl UiiHi mil--' ,.. 3K long. 




Seated: Pete Loskousky, John Yacobellis, Dave Lunt, Carlo 
Walker, Vice-President; Jim Sena, President; Bob Moynihan, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Leonard DeLisio, Gene Cavaliere, Fr. 
Boyle, moderator. 



literary club 



Under the inspired leadership of the Rev. Robert 
Boyle, S. J., this club has become one of the most re- 
spected on the campus. During the year the members 
participate in seminars and round-table discussions. 

The meetings of the club are characterized by 
lively discussions and analyses of great works of literary 



art. The group sponsors lectures by outstanding author- 
ities in various fields of literature and has played host 
to renowned authors. 

With the growth of the English department the 
literary club will continue to expand and thereby in- 
crease its intellectual contribution to the college. 



Page 173 




Front row: Ed Gallegos, Larry Brady, Jim Sena, Bill Roach, 
Joe Chase. Back row: Gene Cavaliere, John Deasy, Maurice 
Mahli, Don Fischer, Ron Hermes. 



veteran's club 



During the past several years, the Vet's Club has 
proved itself to be one of the most helpful and influen- 
tial organizations on the campus. The explicit purpose 
of the organization is to help provide for the social and 
spiritual welfare of its members — the many ex-service- 
men in the student body. 



Working through the office of the Dean of Men, 
the Vet's Club serves in an essential regulating capacity 
at many all-student functions. Active participation by 
this organization in all phases of student life is just one 
of the cohesive influences at work on the campus. 



Page 174 



Officers: Gene Cavaliere, President; Gene Maize, Vice- 
President; Regis Malloy, Student Council Representa- 
tive; Dr. Speer, Moderator; Larry Brady, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Missing. 



Front row: Jim Sena, George Martelon. Back row: Don 
Fischer, Ron Hermes, Regis Malloy, Gene Cavaliere, Vic 
Perrella, Larry Brady. 





Page 175 








Members— front row: Jim Sena, Bob Moore, Bernie O'Neill. 
Members— second row: Mario Mappelli, Louis Petralia, John 
Yacobellis. Officers— back row: Leo Chiolero, Vice-President; 
Jim Phillips, Secretary; Vince Cerrone, President. 



itali 



an 



club 



Contributing immeasurably to the morale of the 
entire student body is the Italian Club's most readily 
apparent effect. The consistently good-humored activi- 
ties of the club's members make many an otherwise 
dull day worth living. 



But more than just good humor, the club contrib- 
utes effective hard work in the backing of many stu- 
dent activities. In addition, its social activities help to 
bind the members and other students in close ties of 
comradeship for the betterment of Regis. 



Page 176 






:\ 



1^1 



*t m 



Tq ^ 



# 



5 » »-» 







Standing: Joe Cummings, Richard Kelly, Jim Danahey, Ray 
Engelhart, Mike Erhard, Bob Moynhan, Father Stansell, Frank 
Sferra, Joe Hawley, Vince Carbone, George Summers. 



history club 



Gaining an insight into modern political and social 
problems through the study of allied circumstances in 
the past is the basic aim of the History Club. Under 
the scholarly guidance of its moderator, the Reverend 
Harold Stansell, S. J., head of the History Department, 
the club presents to history majors and other interested 



students an opportunity to delve deeply into historical 
subjects of constant interest. 

The group, under its officers, Vince Carbone, pres- 
ident, Bob Moynihan, vice-president, and Joe Cum- 
mings, secretary - treasurer, accomplishes its ends 
through debates and seminars on both past and current 
topics of world politics. 



Page 177 




Front row: Lloyd O'Hallearn, Keith Meisel, Jim Obst, Jerry 
Haushaulter, Frank Maggio. Back row: John Dugan, Michael 
O'Hallearn, Bob Kopp, Jim Creamer, Mike Wanebo, Bob 
Rehan, Bill Schaefer. 



alpha delta gamma 



A national Catholic social fraternity whose mem- 
bers strive towards service as well as good fellowship, 
this group of men maintains an association of active 
alumni brothers and supports all functions which bene- 
fit the school. 



The group has grown in stature and number since 
its founding at Regis several short years ago. Among 
its activities is the sponsoring of various social functions 
throughout the year such as the Halloween Dance and 
the Coronation Ball. 



Page 178 



Officers: Frank Cambria, Secre- 
tary; Ted S e r m o n e t, Pledge- 
master; Ray Nass, President; Ron 
Hermes, Vice-President; Charlie 
McCarthy, Treasurer. 




Front row: Ted Foti, Mike Klein, Mike Kennedy, Mick Welles, 
Phil Sharkey, Bob Valko. Back row: Bill McDonough, Terry 
Welsh, Bob Borgerding, Terry Sheehy, Jim Pingpank, Em- 
mett O'Brien, John Geraghty, Jim Bennett. 




Page 179 




Front row: Father Kruger, John Bruggeman, Bob Moynihan, 
John Weber. Back row: Fred Hules, Tom Scaglia, Paul Horan. 



debate society 



Imparting truth and Christian doctrine to the unin- 
formed and improving public speaking for the students 
are the objectives of this organization, directed by the 
Rev. Charles Kruger, S. J. Father Kruger's vast ex- 
perience in radio and public speaking are an invaluable 



asset to the group which enters several intercollegiate 
contests in this area each year. 

Officers of the club are John Bruggeman, presi- 
dent; Bob Moynihan, vice-president; and John Weber, 
secretary. 



Page 180 




Front row: Mr. Stocking, Frank Sferra, Kathy Montoya, Bill 
Zivic, Vince Carbone. Back row: John Yacobellis, Vincent 
Cerrone, Pete Cocoaella, Carl Cecchine, Sol Horn, Duane 
Beal, Joe Hawley, Bob Moore, George Summers, Richard 
Kelly, George Roche, William Hampton, Uvaldo Chavez. 



future teachers 



Giving students who have an interest in teaching 
an opportunity to gain experience through actual teach- 
ing is the purpose of the Future Teachers of America. 

Officers are Frank Sferra, president; Bill Zivic, 
vice-president; Kathy Montoya, secretary; Vince Car- 
bone, treasurer; and Glenn O. Stocking, moderator. 



Teaching in both high schools and elementary 
schools in the Denver area as part of the education 
curriculum is the prime activity of this spirited organi- 
zation. The F.T.A. members also enter into campus 
functions with other clubs. The Regis chapter is an 
outstanding chapter of this nationwide organization. 



Page 181 




Seated: John Halaska, Jim Creamer, Ray Nass, Tom Dean. 
Seated: Mike Dollahan, Roger Gubbins, Jim Butler. 



brown and gold 



Affording the student interested in journalism an 
opportunity for practical experience and bringing to the 
student body news of campus activities are two of the 
principal ends of the student paper. 

With the Rev. Edward Wintergalen, S. J., as mod- 
erator, the Brown and Gold is filled with interesting 
news articles, topical columns, campus chatter, and 
extended sports coverage. In addition to presenting the 
news and feature articles to the students, the paper also 



gives the individual student an opportunity to express 
his views through the "Letters to the Editor" column. 

The bi-weekly publication trains the neophyte 
journalist in the development of a style suitable to 
newspaper work and instills in him the habit of pre- 
senting truth through the popular press. This year the 
paper won special comment as being exceptionally 
well published. 



Page 182 



To the right are pictured the editors of the Brown & Gold. 
Seated is Hank Close, editor-in-chief. Standing are Jim 
Creamer, news editor; the Rev. Edward Wintergalen, S.J. 
moderator; and Dave Sprehe, assistant editor. 



Front row: Tom Birdsall, John Cambria, Phil Sharkey. Back 
row: Dan Otero, Ken Joule, Pete Loskouski, Jim Sena, Dave 
Sprehe, George Park. 





Page 183 




Front row: Dick Rohrer, George Park, Bob Schenk, Mike 
Mayer. Back row: Paul Ban, Len DiLisio, Jim Molchan. Kneel- 
ing: Mike Klein. 



ski club 



The cry, "Ski Heil", was heard soon after Thanks- 
giving this year, getting the enthusiastic members of 
the Ski Club off to an early start. One of the most 
popular clubs on campus, the organization has ex- 
panded its membership to include virtually all the 
skiers at the college. The membership is especially 
large from the ranks of those who have been relegated 
from skis to crutches. The group may be found almost 
completely represented every week at the local ski 
areas. 

During the season the club sponsors trips with other 
ski clubs, locates rides to the areas for skiers, and spon- 



sors intramural races and lessons for beginners within 
the club. 

As a result of injuries the active membership fluctu- 
ates sharply between the season's jubilant beginning to 
its much-mourned end. 

The prime requisites for membership to this ener- 
getic group is the determination, the boards and a 
strong pair of underpinnings to become one of the 
"arrived." Many others feel that a lack of common 
sense is helpful. 



Page 184 




Front row: Dick Hasse, Matt Nickels, Jim Weber, Dick Barnes, 
Bill Stewart. Back row: Don Vollmer, Pete Schwab, Tom Ku- 
kar, Ray Reddick. 



h 



rno c 



hi 



sigma 



Rho Chi Sigma is composed of those students who 
manifest a special interest in chemistry or who intend 
to major in this subject, this group has as its object the 
fostering of student interest and research into the 
myriad phases of the science. 

The chemistry fraternity sponsors lectures and semi- 
nars by outstanding authorities in various fields of 
science in order to stimulate scholastic achievement 



among its members. An extremely high percentage 
of the members of this select group continue their 
studies in graduate schools. This year the American 
Chemical Society welcomed the organization into its 
membership and entitled each of the Regis members 
to affiliation in the society. This means that each 
member of Rho Chi Sigma is entitled to all privileges 
with the exception of the right to vote on matters 
of policy. 



Page 185 




Fr. Harry Klocker, S.J. and members of Aquinas Academy 
pause to pose for group pictures at one of their meetings. 



aquinas academy 




Officers: James Verretta, James Krueger, 
Len DiLisio, John Yacobellis. 



Under the direction of its moderator, Fr. Harry 
Klocker S. J., a doctor of philosophy, this group 
devotes its meetings to discussion of die philosophy 
of St. Thomas Aquinas and of agnostic theories. 
The Academy is composed of members from Regis, 
Loretto Heights, the Air Force Academy, and Den- 
ver University. 



Page 186 




Standing: Irvin Sandoval, Dick Rehrer, Bill Bollwerk, Jim 
Pingpank, George Park, John Gatens. 



r c 



lub 



Recognition of athletic achievement is 
given by membership in the Regis "R" Club 
to those athletes who have distinguished 
themselves in varsity athletics. One of the 
oldest organizations, this honorary member- 
ship group is one of the most exclusive and 
coveted clubs on campus. The aims of the 
club are to encourage better student partici- 
pation in school activities. 



Standing: Jim Wetzel, Steve DiPaola, Arno Muench, 
Ray Nass, Terry Sheehy. 




Page 187 




the 



ranger 



This was the year of ambition. Sam "The Shoulders" 
O'Neal moved into office with revolution and big books 
on his mind. His first official act was to order the best 
yearbooks in the country for reference work. To the 
constant drone of "Keep it consistent," he belabored his 
staff, to get the work done and provided the refresh- 
ments to keep them happy. The mercenary misers, 
Terry Welsh and Ron Hermes, taking a page from the 
annals of Jesse James pushed their campaign to raise 
money. By unscrupulous methods and brute force they 
established a bulging bank account which was over- 
drawn by December. The mystery writer of die year 
was enticed to offer his services through much the same 
methods as were used on Sidney Carton. While Tom 
Tracy diligently cleaned the office, boy-genius Bob 
Britt played until he was enlightened by Sam. Art work 
and funny captions were done by the campus wit, Tom 
Dean. Despite difficulties in focusing, photographers 
Mike Klein, Tom Madden, Mike Roblee, Jim Sambol, 
and Ed Schwartz managed to turn out festoons of pic- 



tures, even though they often lost track of their film 
supply. Nobody did any layouts over the summer, but 
the editor is well laid out now. Hank Close, critic from 
a rival publication, maintains this one should have a 
bibliography. Little does he realize the help that his 
publication was in the matter of providing copy and 
supplies in the dead of night. Our thanks. 

The deadline to beat all deadlines was the last one. 
The first night of the final offensive was a smashing 
triumph of good fellowship which saw a new face 
enter the office with the words, "You hid it on me," and 
depart to the strains of "We're poor little lambs who 
have gone astray." 

Despite the people involved and the misdirected 
energy expended, the work has finally been finished. 
It has been one hell of a year and at least one staff 
member wishes he were graduating this year. As it is, 
he might not even be allowed to return— neither might 
two others. To sum it up, morale was high, morals low, 
and dissipation rampant. 



Page 188 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Eugene P. O'Neal 

Assistant Editor James O'Connor 

Assistant Editor Robert E. Britt 

Business Manager Terry Welsh 

Copy Editor Regis Malloy 

Head Photographer Mike Klein 

Artist Tom Dean 

Advertising Manager Ron Hermes 

Photographers James Sambol, Edward Schwartz, 

Michael Roblee, Thomas Madden 

Workers Tom Tracy, John Gaynor, Michael 

Erhard, Hank Close, Chris O'Don- 
nell, David Sprehe, Mini Beers, 
George Park, Michael Dollahan 

Faculty Advisor Rev. Richard F. Bocklage, S.J. 



Front row: George Park, Regis Malloy, Mike Klein. Back 
row: Mike Roblee, Mike Dollahan, Hank Close, Tom Dean. 




Page 189 





BS& 




ACTIVITIES 



Pare 190 



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Wilson _ 

*» IS l ) » ^ « » * *=■ » 



tfVft« 



h 



azing 



On Tuesday, September 17, two hundred and twen- 
ty-eight incoming freshmen made their first formal ap- 
pearance at the Regis campus. Most of the boarding 
freshmen had not yet learned their prospective room 
numbers before their services were being utilized by 
upperclassmen who felt it their duty to acquaint them- 
selves with the freshmen and make them feel at home. 

On the morning of Friday, September 20, four char- 
tered busses departed through the Colorado fog bound 
for the freshman picnic at Genesee Park in the moun- 
tains. The highlight of the picnic was the excellent 
cuisine furnished by the experienced sophomore chefs. 

Following registration and a series of "Kangaroo 
Courts", the annual hike to Loretto Heights occurred 
in its customary chaotic manner. 

"Justice must triumph." The wheel of justice re- 
versed itself and took an unprecedented turn in favor 
of the freshmen. In the establishment of a new Regis 
tradition of initiation, the freshmen were able to take 
advantage of an unforeseen opportunity for partial re- 
venge because of the indignities suffered at the hands 
of upperclassmen. A day of infamy granted the per- 
mission for freshmen to issue orders at their own caprice 
to any upperclassman so foolish as to remain on campus 
that day. 



The criteria of a good education is 
I told you, Frosh don't drink beer. 









Yeah— I'm a freshman. 



Big Frank has time to spare. 




Page 193 



frosh trot 



The morning of September 28 dawned bright and 
clear, perfect weather for the traditional hike to Loretto 
Heights College. By nine o'clock the freshmen had 
been herded together and started on the twelve mile 
trail drive. 

As time wore on and the drive progressed, the 
frosh became restless because of the refreshing "nectar" 
imbibed by the trail drivers but denied to them. Sev- 
eral times during the drive the freshmen were stam- 
peded by fright, shaving cream, and beer shampoos. 

But all good things eventually end and arrival at 
the promised land brought soothing ministrations at 
the hands of gentle helpers. 




The end of the trail. 
Get on your marks. 



Get set. 




Frosh Queen candidates 











Page 195 




night 
spots 



All is not classes and books in the life of a Regis 
student. Despite his best efforts to devote his time to 
the serious academic pursuits encouraged by the facul- 
ty, he sometimes finds himself in such unlikely spots as 
the libation dispensaries pictured on these pages. It 
is often difficult for the student to comprehend the 
niceties of social intercourse in such non-intellectual 
surroundings but, true to the spirit of determination 
that characterizes a Regis man, he assiduously applies 
himself to the conquest of the problem at hand. All 
evidence points to a remarkable degree of success, of 
proficiency attained, in this tasking field of endeavor. 

Lest one receive the impression that this facet of 
ife at Regis is unimportant, it might be observed that 
certain obligations to another institution in the city are 
incumbent upon the well-rounded Regis man. To sarry 
out these responsibilities, a rather lengthy safari is 
necessary on many occasions. What more logical than 
refreshments at Ernie's on the north end and at the 
King's Court on the south? 

Travel is reputed to be educational. The searching 
scholar naturally experiments with this much touted 
road to learning. More often than not the road turns 
out to be the Roulder Turnpike, which road leads not 
to Rome but to Tulagi's. 

Recognizing the good neighbor pohcy, the altruistic 
Regis student believes in patronizing his neighborhood 
stores. Hence, a sleepy afternoon or a slow evening will 
likely find a representative body of Rangers immersed 
in the atmosphere of the Sunnyside or Billy's. 

No, all is not books and classes in the life of the 
student. 



Relaxing at Tul's 





Page 197 




F^Z^r^rv^^ £-^?^Jk«^W3 



- " 




Sweetheart candidates— rear— Doris Berg, Kiki 
Donahue, Rosie Sebastian, Jane Zengeler. 
Seated— Martha Tipton, Freshman Sweetheart. 




freshman 

sweetheart 

dance 



The Lincoln Room of the Shirley Savoy Hotel was 
the scene of the Sweetheart Dance, marking the end 
of freshman initiation. Something new was added this 
year at the dance, the formal inauguration of the reign 
of a freshman sweetheart. 

Recipient of this new honor was Martha Tipton, 
a charming freshman from Loretto Heights, whose en- 
tourage included Kiki Donahue, Martha Rerg, Rosie 
Sebastian, and Jane Zengeler. The freshmen selected 
their sweetheart by ballot after a spirited campaign 
waged by the backers of the various candidates. 

The traditional presentation of awards to indi- 
vidual freshmen who, during initiation, had distin- 
guished themselves in the eyes of die sophomore class 
was another feature of this memorable dance. 

To Jim Tainter went the award for the outstand- 
ing freshman. Honored as most humorous was Dennis 
Gallagher and as most spirited was Wayne Davis. Tom 
Donahue was recognized with an award as glutton 
for punishment. 

As a rewarding climax to the sometimes strenuous 
initiation period, the Sweetheart Dance registered as 
a great success. 



Regis is so extravagant! 





Congratulations, to Jim Tainter. 
Same play; new cast. 




Twelve Angry Men. 
Oh how they danced. 




Page 199 





Knit one, pearl two 



More than one way 



labs 



Extremes meet in the labs. For the freshmen pre- 
engineering and pre-medical aspirants their first lab 
courses are Chemistry and Biology. Sophomores and 
juniors delve into higher studies in the form of Physics. 
Science majors are subjected to the rigors of Vertebrae 
Anatomy, Embryology and Histology; others find them- 
selves busy with Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis, 
Physical Chemistry and Organic Analysis. Despite the 
many near accidents with scalpels, sparks and sulphuric 
acid in the labs, budding scientists come screaming from 
their work tables at 5 p.m. each evening with the feel- 
ings that they have completed their experiments, but 
often at the expense of instruments and lab instructors. 




So that's what they are. 



I 



'Let it age for three years.' 



He was a good lab partner. 





Now, watch this. 



Echhh! 



Dear Mom 



to skin a cat. 




oween 



Insley's Barn was the only building which could 
possibly have contained the group of frolickers gath- 
ered there for the Halloween Dance sponsored by 
Alpha Delta Gamma. 

The ADG pledges, dressed as lower forms of life 
from the outer reaches of space, cavorted about re- 
ceiving messages from Saturn on their cranial antennae 
and "zapping" innocent bystanders. 




nee 



A bearded Arabian sheik, a "B" movie gangster, 
a dirt farmer and his wife, a bath tub gin manufacturer 
of the prohibition era, relics from a child's nursery, 
an incongruously dressed janitor, and other members 
of the savage Regis horde manifested their presence 
at this meeting of minds marred only by the outer 
world of convention and protocol. From this dance 
one may draw the conclusion that creative thought 
will not die among the men of Regis. 




Page 203 





Boredom's a disease. 



Do we have to make a choice? 



presentation ball 



The annual Presentation Ball sponsored by Alpha 
Kappa Psi was held September 8 in the Lincoln Room 
of the Shirley Savoy Hotel. To the lilting strains of Joe 
Marcus' orchestra the students relaxed after a week of 
mid-term examinations. 

Highlight of the evening was the presentation to 
the student body of the candidates for Queen of Regis. 
With Lou DePaemelere, alumnus member of the host 
fraternity, doing the honors as master of ceremonies, 
the five lovely aspirants to the crown were escorted 
across the stage to the lively applause of the partisan 
audience. 



Must have been funny 



Exhibiting the high caliber of beauty and person- 
ality that has become traditional in the annual queen 
campaign were Francie Ewing, escorted by Larry 
Brady (Alpha Kappa Psi), Jill Oberlin, escorted by 
Bill McDonough (Alpha Delta Gamma), Rosie Sebas- 
tian, escorted by Jim Wetzel (Sodality), Marie Sena, 
escorted by Bill Roach (Vet's Club), and Nancy Walls, 
escorted by Joe Cummings (Denver Club). 

When the dancing ended at the witching hour, 
tucked away was the memory of another notable social 
event. 



Dancing is here to stay. 





Don't tell a soul 




Cheese cake 



Yes, I use Ipana. 




Down, Fang! 




Page 205 




■» 




dial m for murder 



Main production of the year by the Regis College 
Playhouse was Frederick Knott's suspenseful drama, 
"Dial M For Murder." Both a successful Broadway and 
road-show play and a movie by Hitchcock, "Dial M 
For Murder" was a choice vehicle for displaying the 
talents of the players. 

Dennis Gallagher, a freshman making his first ap- 
pearance with the Playhouse, was the hit of the show 
with his masterful portrayal of the "has been" tennis 
star now living off his wife's monev. His consistent 
characterization of Tony Wendice insured for him a 
permanent spot in the Playhouse. 

As Tony's wife Margot, Mary Jo Catlett, a sopho- 
more at Loretto Heights also making her debut with 
the Playhouse, turned in a commendable performance 
of a somewhat difficult role. She was particularly ef- 



fective in the attempted murder scene and her subse- 
quent hysterical breakdown. 

Another freshman and newcomer to the Playhouse 
was Larry Clinton who shared top honors with Dennis 
in his effective portrayal of the seedy confidence man 
and potential murderer. 

Bob Lalich, junior, returned as Inspector Hubbard 
to break the case in his usually efficient manner. Blair 
Farrell, as the third leg of the eternal triangle, and 
Bernie O'Neill, doing a police bit, rounded out the cast. 

Coming up to the high standards demanded by 
the director, the Rev. A. J. Deeman, S. J., and expected 
by the city- wide audience, "Dial M For Murder" ranks 
with the great productions in the Playhouse's past. 






Romance. 



Intrigue. 



Quiet evening. 




skiing 



From the first snow at Thanksgiving to the closing 
of the tow lines in May; from the hot buttered rum in 
December to the keg races in April the schussers of 
Regis may be found in various states of fractured mind 
and limb. 

Because of the unparalled excellence of the snow 
and the magnificent ski areas, skiing ranks first in the 
interest of the vast majority of the students. From 
Thanksgiving to May when the last of the die-hards 
don Bermuda shorts the campus is a virtual week-end 
ghost town. 

The invariable pilgrimage to Aspen during the 
semester break is the high point of the season for the 
novices and experts alike. 

Partly because of the contractual obligations of an- 
other local institution of higher learning which requires 
the purchase of a given number of tow tickets, Arapaho 
Basin is quite popular amongst the economy-minded 
Regis men. 





Going up? 




I'm cold 



I want off 



There's something in my chile 



Page 208 






Medic! 



I'm lost 



Smooth 




Good ol' Charlie Brown 




Beginners 



Where's the beer? 



He hit a tree. 



m^ 
'*£&* 




Page 209 




retreat 



As a fitting prelude to Thanksgiving Day, the 
annual student retreat was held on November 25 
through 27. To accommodate the large number of 
students participating in these exercises, the retreatants 
were divided into two groups. 

Under the direction of the Reverend Edward 
Harris, S. J., seniors, veterans, and married students 
met in the college library to consider the eternal values 
of life according to the "Spiritual Exercises" of St. 
Ignatius Loyola. 

The remainder of the students, under retreat- 
master, the Reverend Lucius F. Cervantes, S. J., met 
in the college chapel for similar consideration, as well 
as discussion, of the spiritual aims of living. 

As one of the primary means of advancing the 
spiritual life of the student at Regis College, the annual 
retreat, with its conferences and opportunities for in- 
dividual counselling, serves to bring about a renewal 
of faith and resolution, to impress once again on the 
mind the lasting values of this life, and to revitalize 
the Catholicism of the retreatant. 



Spiritual reading is of prime importance. 









Devout students pause to meditate. 



Father Harris begins his final remarks. 

! ' 7 I 




Page 211 




coronation 

ball 

of 

1957 






^ 



4 



Social climax of the first semester was the Corona- 
tion Ball. Sponsored again by the Alpha Delta Gamma 
fraternity, the ball was held at the Aviation Country 
Club on December 4. To the music of George Morri- 
son, his orchestra, and his violin, approximately two 
hundred couples danced away the evening. 

Highlight of the festivities was the crowning of 
the girl who would reign as Queen of Regis for 1957-58. 
With the five lovely candidates for the honor grouped, 
with their escorts, around the throne, the Reverend 
Francis E. Malecek, S. J., acting for the Very Reverend 
Richard F. Ryan, S. J., ended a suspense-filled intro- 
duction by announcing that the student body had 



elected as queen, Alpha Kappa Psi's candidate, Miss 
Francie Ewing. 

On hand to crown the happily beaming queen was 
last year's queen, the former Miss Lucille Adducci, 
now Mrs. Mike Severino. 

To the spirited applause of well-wishers, the new 
queen and her escort, Larry Brady, led off the dancing, 
followed by the court, Miss Jill Oberlin, escorted by 
Bob Jones, Miss Nancy Walls, escorted by Frank 
Sferra, Miss Rosie Sebastian, escorted by Jim Wetzel, 
and Miss Marie Sena, escorted by Bill Roach. 

When midnight ended the dancing, what remained 
was yet another pleasant memory of college life. 




Page 213 




That's the last we'll see of that mosquito. 



do 



rm 



It is poetically fitting that the newness of O'Connell 
Hall should contain the feelings of exuberance and rest- 
lessness which exist in the minds and bodies of its fresh- 
man-sophomore residents. The quiet and conservatism 
of its gleaming interior is frequently shattered by the 
voices, nay screams, of its occupants who occasionally 
take their God-given liberties of freedom of speech and 
peaceful assembly and twist them to their own caprice. 

However, the more serious minded students who 
utilize their free time to develop mature study habits 
may draw solace from the fact that a full staff of pre- 



life 1 



fects under competent, unbiased leadership endeavors 
to enforce the ideal study conditions of quiet and order 
that a semblance of peace may be maintained. 

But all study need not be from books. Where else 
can a young man learn an interesting method of break- 
ing a finger or wrist? Where else practice strange 
Oriental strangle holds on a friend? Where else find 
the proper atmosphere for planning an evening's in- 
tellectual entertainment? Where but in the hallowed 
un-ivied halls of O'Connell, home away from home. 



Funny, funnee! 



Daily routine 



Whaddya mean, you can't go? 










Well, that's 3 to 2 in favor of Steve Allen 



Hart, Schaffner, and Melrose 



Yessir, Yessir 



I'm making it! 





li 







We get the darndest jobs 



Why Johnny can't read 



Dugan makes a haul 



Relaxing 



I tell you, I don't smoke 



Braves fan 




Page 215 




lif 

off 
campus 



Anything for the family 



Now look, I have a big test tomorrow 




There's nothing like a home-cooked meal! 



Page 216 





How many did Boone get? 



Trying to study while ignoring a crying baby, coping 
with the mysteries of culinary art, shopping for gro- 
ceries, doing the housecleaning; these are but a few of 
the extra-academic booby traps that plague the lives 
of the bachelor and married students living off campus. 
The intricacies of Aquinas and the wails of an infant 
whose stomach, despite the clock, tells him it's dinner 
time, present a counterpoint that is strange to all but 
the married student who has learned to accept it as a 
part of daily life. As a by-product of his collegiate 
career, many a bachelor student will end up with a fa- 
cility in home economics that might well be the envy 
of certain majors from some other academic institu- 
tions. But the apartment life is not without its com- 
pensations for, after all, a refrigerator can be used to 
keep more things cold than just the baby's milk or the 
eggs for breakfast. 



Dinner at "Ma" Borgerding's 





Page 217 



1 





Gee fellas, I like this game! 




(Posed by professional models) 



Two of a kind 



don't feel well 



I've been sick 



I feel great! 




Page 218 




and bring it back 



Where'd you get that gun? 




it says here that man is a rational animal 




Don't deny it, Nass. 



dorm life 11 



Boarder Band. 



Leaders of tomorrow! 




Home of the man of distinction, hotel for seniors, 
service station for embryonic socialites, occasional study 
hall, nemesis of card-sharks, frequent distillery, nest of 
unrest and intellectual fermentation, recording studio. 
Carroll Hall is all of these, and yet, it is none at all. To 
the pessimist and extreme realist it is the former. To 
the optimist and, perhaps, dreamer, it is the embodi- 
ment and personification of those elements which are 
considered to be an integral part of an upperclassman 
boarder's life. 

Carroll Hall, the oldest dormitory on campus, has 
seen both the pessimist and the optimist; but more than 
these, it has seen a combination of both types. The 
men in this hall have reached the age where they 
neither build mansions in the air nor slums where there 
is beauty. Theirs is maturity born of their dual roles 
of students of today and leaders of tomorrow. These 
are the men who will shape the destiny of the world 
of the future. These are the men of Carroll Hall, the 
men of Regis. 



Page 219 





night classes 



Solitude. 



. and it's the door marked "men". 




How do you spell Shakespeare? 





Aimed primarily at the working man or woman 
unable to attend during the day, the night school fills 
an area-wide need by offering courses in business and 
the liberal arts that are attractive alike to students 
striving for a degree as well as to people who merely 



want to be better informed. Particular emphasis is 
placed upon the courses offered in business to assist 
the local businessman in bettering his methods and 
operations and to permit the working man to increase 
his knowledge so as to advance in his chosen field. 



Who's buried in Grant's tomb? 



I've got the test! 




Page 221 




The queen and her court. 



h 




Whaddya know, a garter snake! 



omecoming 



Alumni enjoy their homecoming. 



Fr. Ryan addresses the crowd. 



I don't get it. 



"*%SI 




Under the co-sponsorship of the alumni association 
and the student body, the first of what is hoped will 
become a tradition of homecoming festivities was held 
on February 7 and 8. 

Kickoff of the festivities was the dance at Wolhurst 
Country Club on Friday evening. A dance floor packed 
with students and alumni vied with the several refresh- 
ment stands for the attention of the gratifyingly large 
crowd that attended. High point of the dance was the 
crowning by Frank Cambria of the Homecoming 
Queen, Miss Mary Ann McCluskey of Loretto Heights. 

Preceding the game on Saturday, flagging spirits 
were revitalized with the able assistance of John Bar- 
leycorn at a cocktail party for the alumni. Following 
this convivial gathering, the alumni joined the students 
for a buffet dinner in the student center. 

Climax of the affair was the basketball game be- 
tween the Rangers and the Wayne State Tartars on 
Saturday evening at the Denver City Auditorium. 
Playing before a staunchly partisan crowd, the Rangers 
ran away with the game from the very outset, drubbing 
their opponents 83-57, a fitting ending to an enjoyable 
homecoming celebration. 



Alumni Buffet. 





Page 223 



^_^^^^^__ 




KBTV looks at Regis of Today as Father Murray looks at Regis of Yesterday. 



kbt 



v series 



Father Murray recalls the past. 



Television cameraman prepares for close-up. 




Page 224 




"Regis of Today" has grown with the television in- 
dustry itself. Over the years it has offered educational 
opportunities to the people of Denver and surrounding 
area. Every Saturday afternoon over Station KBTV, 
one of the faculty members, assisted by college or high 
school students, has held "class" for his television au- 
dience. Truly these "classes" constituted a treasure of 
knowledge on a variety of academic subjects. Father 
Boyle, Mr. Klene, and Mr. Morriss exposed the field 
of literature to view. Father Wintergalen conducted a 
"class" on economics. Father Cervantes, Father Mc- 
Gloin, and Father Stowe spoke on various aspects of 
sociology. Father Murray reviewed the history of Regis 
itself for Denverites. 

Father Cervantes was co-ordinator of the program 
and received able assistance from Frank Sierra, student 
producer. 



*t~^~ 







Engineer focuses Fr. Wintergalen into view. 



Mr. Klene discusses Dryden. 




Page 225 




center 



• • 



activities 



Focal point of much of the campus social activity 
is the new Student Center. Boarder and day students 
banquets and the senior dinner were held here last 
winter. The large dining area is available for dances 
while the snack bar caters to the student wanting to 
grab a bite on the run. The large and modern kitchen 
and serving line accommodate the boarders with tiieir 
three meals a day. 

For just sitting and talking the student lounge, beau- 
tifully furnished in leatherette chairs and couches, 
beckons as an attractive meeting place. The student 
desiring to test his steadiness of eye and cue finds 
ample competition at the four magnificent pool tables 
in the pool room. 

Faculty members find, in the beautifully appointed 
faculty lounge, an oasis for relaxation from their pro- 
fessorial and administrative duties. 



Pretty as a picture. 



Senior buffet offers special treat. 



Loyal fans at Circle K rally. 




Page 226 




Sea-sick. 



Mustard in coffee? 



Kill it! 




Banquet style dinner. 



Repast. 




Willie Hoppe of Regis. 




Page 227 





Trip to Aggies 



Coming-in Party. 




Two more for us. 



Pre-game congestion. 



Ten-seconds to go! 





Page 228 



loyal 
fans 



Scarcely less important than the contest he attends 
is the loyal fan. Every game sees him trooping to the 
spacious City Auditorium or on those few necessary 
times he crowds into the ancient college gym, toler- 
ating splinters in his flannels and near falls from the 
balcony. Being a spectator, he mostly spectates — that 
is, sits and watches. He patiently tolerates cheerleaders 
and organized yells, occasionally he even participates. 
When not sitting, he is buying— hot dogs or coffee or 
cokes, but never pennants or mums. If he is an old 
grad he probably has a raucously better time than the 
students. If not a freshman he has a date. If a senior 
he made the date just before the game. No matter what 
he is, the score or spectacular play brings him leaping 
to his feet in excitement. If the game is not too far from 
Denver he migrates with the team and loyally cheers 
them to their greatest efforts. If the game is far from 
home he rousingly sends the teams off to victory and 
no matter what the hour of returning, just as rousingly 
welcomes his team home to the great chagrin of all 
airport officials. The Ranger photographers reversed 
their cameras to obtain these pictures of him. 




Upsy-Daisey. 



Royal Send-Off. 





Page 229 




Walker serves the governor's mother. 

A milestone in the College's march of progress was 
reached on Sunday evening March 2 with the first an- 
nual Awards Banquet. Sponsored by the Sodality, the 
overwhelmingly successful banquet was a definite 
"first" in the history of Regis. Guests of honor included 
the Governor of Colorado, the Mayor of Denver, two 
justices of the State Supreme Court, and distinguished 
businessmen of the city of Denver. 

To recognize outstanding leaders amongst the stu- 
dents in all areas of accomplishment — studies, ath- 
letics, student government, extra-curricular activities — 
was the purpose of the affair. Recognition of commend- 
able achievements and contributions on the part of 
notable alumni was likewise obtained through the 
awarding of trophies to such men as the Honorable 
Stephen L. R. McNichols, the Honorable Edward C. 
Day, Mr. Walter Coughlin, and Mr. Paul L. Schmitz, 
C.RA. 

For its spirited contribution to Regis, the banquet 
was acclaimed a smashing success by all concerned. 




New and old Executive Boards. 




Nass receives award. 



Mayor Nicholson 



George Martelon— Master of Ceremonies 
Cocozella— best student Dinner is served. 




Page 230 



w gmmm 




Paul Rotar merited. 



Repast 



Governor McNichols 




Honored Guests. 




awards 
banquet 






Beaucoup de chance. 



Lochinvar, the spineless one. 



th 



extra dividend 



Found and then lost. 




Diercks on the Chase. 




Mike Hammer and friends. 



Bridgitte incognito. 




Sam told a joke. 



Othello or lago? 



Page 232 






If you had feathers you'd be a falcon. 



Get off the grass. 



Is there a berth on this train? 





Morning or afternoon? 



Section eight of the morals code? 



And I got a witch. 






Yea big to the left. 



Just like Niagara. 



If mother could see us now! 





Dear Father, I'm broke again. 



I just love Regis. 



Got money, will travel. 



Page 233 




Lotsa luck. 



Future Teachers of America. 





Checkmate, old bean. 





Chuck White on date. 



Ching Whey!!! 



Tell me the story of your life. 




i 



/ -~> 




x 



UN 










ln^ 



^ 




Name, rank and serial number , 



Heil Hitler!!! 



Buchenwald? Dauchau? 




Detect alcohol in mix 




Deerslayer. 



Page 234 



The Regis Precision Marching Band is 
composed entirely of volunteers. 






: 


h \ 




J 


1 '{3 


D|> 




1 

1 





To arms, fly— away, the Greeks!!! 




Oh, pshaw!! 




Who's kidding who? 




Kinsey reporter. 



Get a load of that one. 



Well, I did as a child, but!!! 



th 

extra 
dividend 





Damned fish died. 



Who says I don't go to Lorr . 





But Brutus is an honorable man. 



Acme at work. 



Page 235 






wsEm 



mm 






7m 




ADVERTISING 



Page 236 




<*•* 



^ 



t M 




t* 



SACRED HEART" 



77m page ??jac?e possible through the courtesy of 

WILFRED G. EYRE 



Page 238 




GOOD LUCK 
REGIS MEN 

Remember for the finest in food 
and drink; where Regis men 
meet 

Banquet room available to 
Regis men 



ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 



% block off Federal on 44th 




I ONLY COLLEGE LIFE GIVES YOU 



! 






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Protects your greatest asset — your future earning 
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protection obtainable. 

3. Cash When It's Needed — At retirement, or to 
your beneficiary. Cash or loan values are available 
for emergencies or to take advantage of business 
opportunities. 



OF THESE IMPORTANT BENEFITS 



4. Cash Dividends — Savings and profits, resulting 
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5. Low Cost — Because we sell only to college men 
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7. Unqualified Safety — All reserves actually on 
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THE ONLY LIFE INSURANCE 
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BEST'S — Leading Insurance Authority Says: "The College Life Insurance Company of America is conser- p 
vatively and capably managed, has reputable backing and has made substantial progress since organiza- p 
tion. . . . The results achieved by the company have been very favorable. . . . We recommend this company." A 

I 



"Buy Where You 

p Benefit Most" 



Bob Harfert— Agent for College Life 



1385 South Ingalls Street 



Denver 15, Colorado 



Page 239 



4 




Compliments of 

R. & C. Wholesale Co. 



Paul Rossmiller 

• • • 

Donald Cullen 



JOHNNIE MARINO'S 
LOG CABIN INN 



3109 Federal Blvd. 



ALWAYS A FRIEND OF REGIS 
SERVING THE BEST IN FOOD AND DRINK 



LOG CABIN 

Hours: 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Daily 

8 A.M. to 8 P.M. Sundays 

Gl 5-9846 



Page 240 




Try the EDELWEISS 

For Good Food & Drinks 

1644Glenarm AC 2-0700 



ACME CHEMICAL CO. 



'For over 60 years, quality above all" 



Milwaukee, Wisconsin 




Compliments of 

william j. Mcdonough 



Page 241 



VI 



Compliments 
of 

LOUIS J. MILLER 


Antiques Indian Goods Gifts 
Since 1888 

KOHLBERG'S 

429 Seventeenth Street 
Denver, Colorado 


KING'S COURT LOUNGE 
AND RESTAURANT 

An Oasis Between Regis 

And Loretto Heights 

1000 So. Federal Blvd. 

WEst 4-9688 Denver 


Compliments 
of 

GORMAN AND SON 
MEAT MARKET 

14th and Peoria 
Aurora, Colorado 


Compliments 
of 

CENTER PHARMACY 

Cosmetics — Fountain Service — Gifts 

LES LAKEY-BOB SUMNER 

GE 3-6381 Free Delivery 
4030 Tennyson St. Denver, Colo. 


Compliments 
of 

JEFFERSON TYPEWRITER 

5310 West Colfax j 
BElmont 7-2687 j 


Compliments 
of 

LINDAHL'S 

1637 Court Place 
Denver, Colorado 


Compliments 

of 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Pingpank 



Page 242 



mr* 




Compliments of 



A. A. 



McCUE 



Dress Properly 
For Special Affairs 

WE RENT DRESS SUITS 

for 

PROMS WEDDINGS 

FORMAL EVENTS 

Complete Line of Accessories 

C. B. (3ILLILAND &. CO. 

Formal Wear — Sales, Rentals 

1029 17th St. KE 4-3585 

Denver, Colorado 



Absolutely the 

Finest 

in Choice 

Beef 



SAMBOL PACKING CO. 



Kansas City 3, Kansas 



Page 243 




Save Time Laundryette 

Clothes washed, fluff dry and folded 
Dry cleaning— Shirt finishing 

4224 Tennyson St. 
Phone GR 7-0631 



7169 North Federal 
HA 9-1824 

Pizza Pies — Homemade Spaghetti 

Sandwiches — Raviolli 

Carry-out Orders 




This picture made possible through the courtesy of 
DR. AND MRS. JOHN MAYER JR. 



Page 244 



Who or What is the Qood )ian in 
Modern American Society? 

by 
ROBERT E. BRITT 

Who killed him? 

Who killed the bright-headed bird? 

You did . . . 

You drowned him in your cocktail 

brain . . . 

You hit him with an album of Hindemith 

You stabbed him with stainless steel by 

Isamu Noguchi . . . 

You killed him! You killed him. 

In your God damned Brooks Brothers suit. 

You son of a bitch. 

Dylan Thomas, by Kenneth Rexroth 
Time— December 2, 1957 

That's right. You killed him. You spineless jellyfish. I hope you "good" men are proud of yourselves. 
I can "see the expression of satisfaction on your stereotyped minds. Yes, you're happy alright. You've gotten 
such a masochistic "kick" out of your gutlessness and futility that you have become little crusaders for your 
miserable cause. Yes, at least you do have a cause. You feel that anybody who has a mind and opinions of 
his must have that individualistic flame and brightness erased. 

You're successful too. You use every method in the book. Your mentors must have been the origi- 
nators of a perfect brainwashing technique. Yes, you hammer a man to death with your pedagoguery, your 
smugness, the dictates of your demigods. You break a man until he becomes just another cog in your 
monstrous juggernaut. 

What happens to him then? Do you leave him alone? Do you give him any freedom? Does he ever 
become a man again? No, you reduce him to a listless, impotent wretch who fears to be alone with his con- 
science and whose spark of individualism and independence is snuffed out. But, just how do you sadists 
do this? 

You thrust out your tentacles and drag a man into your fashionable society. You drown him in your 
3 to 1 martinis, you smother him with your Marlboros, you shove him down upon plush bar stools in your 
exclusive night clubs. Your entertainers fog his mind with their lewd party jokes, their double-edged com- 
ments, their clever sarcasm, and their morbid wit. Your victim begins to hate to be alone without your pre- 
digested entertainment, your witty conversation, your smooth manners, and your easy women. He is being 
formed as a member of your society, but he is still a little different for some reason. You are pleasing his 
body and his senses, but you haven't warped his mind to yours. You are dissatisfied with him. He isn't 
quite convinced that he should go all the way with you. You're a little bit worried, so you bring in some of 
your more crafty propogandists. 

You now thrust music into his fevered brain. You figure that music hath power to soothe the savage 
beast. Even your music shows the way you think an d act. You operate in the same circuitous pattern every 
time. Most of the time it works, but there are some men that aren't so easily sucked-in by your sweetness 
and subtle hypocrisy. You set up your favorite music as the music of complete discipline, the music of 
machines, the music of pseudo-geniuses who write for your cause of the moment. It's the music of another 
man trapped in your insidious net of conformity and imprisonment of soil. The only reason that your musi- 
cian hasn't been cast in the robes of a pariah is that you can use his talents. Yes, you milk a man dry of his 
very marrow of spirit. You search into the very depths of a man's soul to find what you can use. After he 
has lost his use, you throw him out of your machine and substitute a new part. That is precisely what 
you consider a man. If you can make him beat his brains out for you, you track him down and snare him. 
You make your ideas his ideas, your opinions his opinions, and your soul his soul. If you want a man you'll 
get him or kill him as a social being. 

But, your victim is still in the dark. You show him your manifestations of discipline of mind and 
ideas. Even your art reflects functional design of material and scope. You're not very subtle in his respect. 
You're about as subtle as a prostitute waving a red lantern. You have the stupidity to use something as 
functional as stainless steel to concretize your ideas. You make utter fools of yourselves because by your 
over-enthusiasm and exuberance some people can see right through your outer crust of gentleness to your 
core of hate. The design of your sculpture in itself reflects your insecurity. Your planes and sweeping lines 
flow out in all directions, but they always have to come back to a point of resolution. In that respect, they 
are just like you. They are afraid to go out into the great unknown and find out what lies beyond the nar- 
row confines of their tiny world of materialism. Yes, you're beginning to crack up a little bit. A little bit, 
but just enough to let those who don't fear you see what you are: a writhing mass of pain and hate. 

There was once such a man. He wasn't your "good" man. He didn't follow your ideas of conformity 
and blind obedience. He saw you for what you were and tried to help you. You were too proud and self- 
centered to listen to him. What did you do? You tried to prove that he was wrong and insane. You failed 
miserably. You tried to break his spirit by attempting to humiliate him in the eyes of your world. You 
were humiliated yourselves because your intense hatred vomited forth your insane jealousy, your over- 
powering fear, and your sadistic cruelty. 

But there is one thing that is a credit to you. You broke his heart and his body. And, by doing that, 
you showed the world for ages just how much love for us any man could ever have. You gave us the first 
real martyr. You gave us Jesus Christ. 

I know that you will continue to persecute the man of ideals, the man of personal opinions and 
thought. I hope that I am not the man shouting in a cave just so I can hear the echoes. God forgive me. God 
help me. I am no better than any of you, for I am one of you. 

COMPLIMENTS OF C. R. W. 



Page 245 



m 



FEHR'S FLOWERS 

In Cavaleri's Mart 
1948 W. 48th at Tejon 

* 

Smartly Styled Corsages 
GR. 7-2367 


Good Luck Regis 

Compliments of 

CHEERIOS RESTAURANT 

1997 South Federal Blvd. 

Denver, Colorado 

WEST 4-9634 


Compliments of a friend 


^M& ECONOMICAL 
ALTA VISTA GROCERY 

San Pablo, Colorado 


CURDOLAC FOOD COMPANY 

P. O. Box 472 
WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN, U. S. A. 


MARHOEFER 
PACKING CO. 


Compliments 
of 

THE JEFFERSON RECORD 



Page 246 




The Marian Hall is a familiar sight to the many 
Regis students who frequent the Loretto campus. 



CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS 

Compliments 
of 

LORETTO HEIGHTS STUDENT BODY 



Page 247 



JACK AND TEENY'S 
BAR AND GRILL 

Best in Food & Drink 

Free Popcorn 

Known to Regis Men 
as 
"Sunnyside" 

4407 W. 52nd Ave., Denver 



Frozen Food To Go Phone GL 5-7702 
Denver's Original 

JIM'S PIZZERIA 

"King of Pizza Pie" 

Italian Spaghetti— Home Made Ravioli 

Lasagna 

Orders to Go 

Open Daily 4 p.m. till 2 a.m. 

Sundays 4 p.m. till Midnight 

Closed Mondays 



Friday afternoon club 



is a must at 



the sink 



Boulder, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

MOUNTAIRE FARMS, INC. 

( Successors to Maplecrest Farms 
of Colo., Inc.) 

1410 Cottonwood Street 
Denver 4, Colorado 

"The Finest Poultry Products" 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



CONRAD S. ADAMS 
712 Iowa St. 
Golden, Colorado 

KENNETH J. BABBITT 
41 1 N. Leroux St. 
Flagstaff, Arizona 

EDWARD R. BEAUVAIS 
3201 W. 19th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS C. BIRDSALL 
38 Crestwood Drive 
St. Louis 5, Missouri 

SIDNEY A. BLUBAUGH 
2111 S. Topeka 
Wichita, Kansas 

WILLIAM J. BOLLWERK 

509 Midvale 

St. Louis, Missouri 

ROBERT BORGERDING 
1679 Prarie Ave. 
Beloit, Wisconsin 

ROBERT G. BUCKLEY 
850 S. Harrison 
Denver, Colorado 

FRANCIS A. CAMBRIA 

161 21st St. 

Brooklyn 32, New York 

VINCENT F. CARBONE 
2105 York St. 
Denver, Colorado 

DONALD J. CHAMPEAU 
1 1 2 W. 4th St. 
Leadville, Colorado 

JOSEPH L. CHASE 
9261 Ciancio St. 
Thornton, Colorado 

JOHN B. CHAVEZ 
3121 Lawrence St. 
Denver, Colorado 

LLOYD J. CHURCHILL 
7080 W. 16th Place No. 3 
Denver, Colorado 

UVALD S. CHAVEZ 
53 So. Decatur St. 
Denver, Colorado 

HENRY J. CLOSE 
103 Broadway 
Wilmette, Illinois 



Page 248 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

ROMAULD P. COMPTON 
932 Pontiac St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JOSEPH P. CUMMINGS 
5835 E. 17th St. 
Denver, Colorado 

EDWARD L. CURRAN 
2346 Ash St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES P. DANAHEY 
395 S. Gaylord 
Denver, Colorado 

DONALD L. DILL 
3110 Clay St. 
Denver, Colorado 

RICHARD A. DINES 
775 Columbine 
Denver, Colorado 

MICHAEL J. DOLLAHAN 
1 839 W. Estes Ave. 
Chicago, 26, Illinois 

PAUL J. DORING 
600 E. Meyer Blvd. 
Kansas City, Missouri 

DALE A. DURAN 
281 S. Pearl 
Denver, Colorado 

ARTHUR L. DURAND 
2230 Galena St. 
Aurora, Colorado 

MICHAEL W. ERHARD 
1524 N. Cascade Ave. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

DENNIS M. FOLEY 
1010 S. Elizabeth 
Denver, Colorado 

EDWARD H. GALLEGOS 
La Jara, Colorado 

JOHN T. GATENS 
3580 Springfield Drive 
Charleston, W. Va. 

JOHN J. GAYNOR 

388 High St. 

Webster, Massachusetts 

LOUIS A. GERWECK 

Box 183 

Cheyenne Wells, Colorado 

EDWARD F. GORMLEY 

30 U. St. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



DENVER GOLF 
AND TENNIS 



1807 WELTON ST. 
DENVER, COLORADO 




DRIVE IN FOR 



A COM PIE 




STAN'S BERKELEY SINCLAIR 



Compliments of 

A GOOD FRIEND AND 

NEIGHBOR TO REGIS 

BILLY'S INN 

We serve the finest in food and drinks 

The corner of 44th and Lowell 
Only 6 blocks from the campus 



'Trophies for Champions" 



COLORADO BADGE COMPANY 



2051 Champa St., Denver, Colorado 



Pace 249 



Compliments of 

THE BONFIRE LOUNGE 

7576 Morrison Road 
Denver, Colorado 



KORN'S 
Men Shop 



"Specializing in clothing and 
sports wear for young men" 



503 16th Street 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments and 

Best Wishes 

of 

Bernard J. Duffy 
Shamrock Restaurant 

1645 Tremont 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments of a friend 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

JOHN D. GOULD 
380 Cook St. 
Denver, Colorado 

CHARLES A. GRAHAM 
440 Holly St. 
Denver, Colorado 

ROGER D. GUBBINS 
2244 Evans Rd. 
Flossmoor, Illinois 

JOHN V. HALASKA 
6423 W. Washington Blvd. 
Wauwatosa 13, Wisconsin 

JAMES J. HANSON 
727 Fillmore St. 
Denver, Colorado 

WARREN C. HARTENBACK 
14 Countryside Lane 
Kirkwood 22, Missouri 

RICHARD W. HASSE 
421 N. Broadway 
Joliet, Illinois 

NORMAN L. HAUG 
8600 W. 26th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 

JOSEPH W. HAWLEY 
3090 Dahlia St. 
Denver, Colorado 

RONALD D. HERMES 
528 Elmwood Drive 
Spencer, Iowa 

RICHARD P. HOLLAND 
4325 East Lewis 
Wichita, Kansas 

WILLIAM P. HOBAN 
3203 Tennyson St. 
Denver, Colorado 

SOL W. HORN 
1780 W. 50th St. 
Denver, Colorado 

MICHAEL H. KENNEDY 

19 Thorndell Drive 

Richmond Heights 17, Missouri 

MARTIN R. KOPP 
4 Rolling Hills Drive 
Florissant, Missouri 

JAMES E. KRUEGER 
1 1 5 South Neosho 
Emporia, Kansas 

GEORGE F. LUTITO 
4240 Decatur St. 
Denver, Colorado 



Page 250 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 

william j. Mcdonough 

9421 S. Winchester Ave. 
Chicago 20, Illinois 

ARTHUR J. MANSFIELD 
2067 So. Fillmore 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE A. MARTELON 
4635 Tejon St. 
Denver, Colorado 

ROGER D. MARTINEZ 

Box 73 

Derby, Colorado 

DONALD E. MOORE 
6690 W. 45th Place 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT F. MOORE 
3638 Humboldt, St. 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT D. MOYNIHAN 
1317 0gden 
Denver, Colorado 

RAYMOND D. NASS 
R. R. 2 
Plymouth, Illinois 

WILLIAM J. O'DONOGHUE 
751 Bellaire 
Denver, Colorado 

LLOYD S. O'HALLEARN 
South Gables Blvd. 
Wheaton, Illinois 

MICHAEL J. O'HALLEARN 
South Gables Blvd. 
Wheaton, Illinois 

EUGENE P. O'NEAL 
7167 Washington 
University City 5, Missouri 

LOUIS L. ORTIZ 
3246 Franklin 
Denver, Colorado 

PETER J. PAOLI 
5127 Lowell Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE M. PARK 
1702 S. Cheyenne 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

LOUIS S. PETRALIA 
3334 Navajo St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES F. PINGPANK 
2 North Crane Road 
Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 



THE SPORTSMAN INN 

featuring 3 D! 

Dine — Dance — Drink 

in 

Fine Fashion 

Lafayette, Colorado 




SEMORS 



JOHN McCOY 

744 No. 4th St. 
Milwaukee 3, Wisconsin 



STYLES FO 



m 



o 

L 



r 

p 



r 

E 




I 

R 



S 

T 



Distinctive Clothes for Men 

YOUR "PLAYBOY" STORE 
429 16th Street 



PL&YSOV 




The Record Shop of Distinction 



HARMONY RECORD SHOP 

1511 Welton Street 

Everything in Recorded music 

CH 4-2827 
Denver 2, Colorado 



Page 251 




MERKL'S SERVICE STATION 



4437 West 38. Ave. 



Denver, Colorado 



Good luck Regis 

Compliments 
of 

GOLF LAND 

Ted Hart 



LOWELL PHARMACY 

(just a block from school) 

Could I cash a check? 
Sure, we'll cash your check! 

Roy and Maxine Cain 

4901 Lowell Blvd. 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



JOHN N. PORRECA 
351 4 Shoshone St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES R. RAINE 
207 Leiter Ave. 
Leadville, Colorado 

RICHARD L. ROHRER 
Box 286 
Strasburg, Colorado 

PAUL A. ROTAR 
5505 Saulsbury Ct. 
Denver, Colorado 

DANIEL E. SAMIDE 
2835 W. 42nd Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 

ELIVINIO SANDOVAL 
822 S. 4th 
Brighton, Colorado 

ANTHONY F. SANTOPIETRO 
522 Humboldt St. 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT J. SCHENK 
217 No. Roosevelt 
Wichita 8, Kansas 

DONALD L. SCHMITZ 
1280 Eudora 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM J. SCHMITZ 
6981 Warren Drive 
Denver, Colorado 

FREDERICK A. SCOTT 
635 Olive St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES R. SENA 
1924 W. 34th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 

TED J. SERMONET 
3045 No. Bartlett Ave. 
Milwaukee 11, Wisconsin 

FRANKLIN J. SFERRA 
4530 Balsam 
Denver, Colorado 

PHILIP J. SHARKEY 
Box 13 
Toulon, Illinois 

FRANCIS C. SHYNE 
11372 Grandmont Road 
Detroit 27, Michigan 



Page 252 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



ROBERT J. SMILANIC 
3619 So. Pearl 
Denver, Colorado 

LAWRENCE J. SPRINGER 
2486 So. Monroe 
Denver, Colorado 

GERALD H. STARKEY 
701 Pennsylvania 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM P. STEWART 
1120 Carteret 
Pueblo, Colorado 

GEORGE D. SUMMERS 
355 W. Irving Place 
Denver, Colorado 

ALLEN L. TAYLOR 
1344 So. Eudora 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS G. TORREY 
1348 W. 46th St. 
Denver, Colorado 

HOWARD A. TRITZ 
4251 Grove 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES C. VERRETTA 
3605 Allison St. 
Denver, Colorado 

JOSEPH A. VILLARREAL 
Antonito, Colorado 

RICHARD J. VITRY 
5061 Meade 
Denver, Colorado 

JOSEPH P. WEBER 
1158 So. York 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES H. WEBER 
4520 Vance 
Denver, Colorado 

MARTIN W. WELLES 
4036 N. Prospect Ave. 
Milwaukee 1 1, Wisconsin 

FRANCIS J. WOERTMAN 
4446 Wolff 
Denver, Colorado 

FRANCIS A. ZITO 
4023 Umatilla 
Denver, Colorado 




HICKS-DENVER COMPANY 



1235 STOUT 
DENVER, COLORADO 



MARIGOLD CAFE 

Real Italian Food 

Italian Pizza Pie 

BEER-WINE 
MIXED DRINKS 

4100 Tejon Street 
Phone GL 5-9859 



SEIFERT PONTIAC-CADILLAC INC. 



PAUL SEIFERT, President 



6300 E. Colfax — FRemont 7-2747 



DENVER, COLORADO 



Page 253 




F 
R 

E 
E 

M 

A 

N 



CORDOVAN TROPHIES 

by FREEMAN 




Genuine Shell Cordovan 

Rich, aristocratic leather famed tor 

durability. ..and for a brilliance that 
grows with every shine. Distinguished 

plain-toe seam/ess style Oxford. $22** 

Wonderful feeling FREEMAN Siloes 10" lo 24" 



s 

H 

O 
E 

S 




Page 254 



Auto Accessories 

Washing-Lubricating 

Pick Up and Delivery Service 



ASHKER'S 




SERVICE 



4900 Lowell Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 

Joseph R. Ashker, Prop. Gl 5-7529 




FOR 

REGIS MEN . . . 

REGAL QUALITY 

FORMAL WEAR 

Visit the store 

that offers 

America's best 

variety in all 

quality formal 

style & acessories 

"After Six" Label 

30 Superb styles 

Dinner jackets 
in sixteen colors. 

One Hundred 
cummerbund patterns. 



%L 



FOR RENT 
FOR SALE 



1?a«dalls 



VINCENT BURNS, Regis '50, assists MIKE KENNEDY in 
choosing a colorful Formal ensemble for the REGIS PROM. 



161 1 Glenarm 
AM 6-0608 



Page 255 




Page 256 




Compliments of Coughlin & Company 




Specializing 
in the 

Finest Italian Foods 

HOMEMADE 

LASAGNA 

RAVIOLI 

SPAGHETTI 

Any combination pizza 
of your choice 

Eat Here Or Take Out 



QUEENIE'S 

3535 Tejon 



PIZZERIA 



GE 3-3518 



Page 257 




Eddie Bohn's 

NEW PIG 'N WHISTLE VILLAGE 

DENVER'S SMARTEST MOTOR HOTEL 

4801 WEST COLFAX AVENUE 
AComa 2-0861 

Dining and Cocktails 



HEAD OF THE CLASS 

For straight 

A-h-h-h-h-h-h's 

"the sweetest thing on the shelf" 





CANE AND MAPLE SYRUP 



VINCENT SYRUP COMPANY 

DENVER, COLORADO 



Page 258 



Your SUPERIOR Class of '58 

You are convinced your class is all of that — and as you make homes of your 
own in the years to come, you'll be sold on another Superior Class of '58 — 
the over 58 varieties of top quality sausage products bearing Superior Brand 
and Picnic Brand labels. 

Best wishes for your futures. 

DENVER WHOLESALE MEAT COMPANY 

2706 West Colfax Ave., Denver 4, Colorado 




The Beer That 
Made Milwaukee Famous 



it 



Murray Bros. Distributing Co. 



Denver, Colorado 



* 



Page 259 



OV HIGHEST QUALITY 




\M// 



WILLIAM CROW 

JEWELER 

Established 1924 

Diamonds . Watches . Silverware . Jewelry 

Ring Designing and Remounting 
Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Third Floor, University Bldg. 

910 16th Street Ke. 4-6336 

Denver 2, Colorado 




ANDY KLEIN 

PONTIAC 



78th and 69 Highway 
Overland Park, Kansas 



Page 260 




SAINT JOHN FRANCIS REGIS. S 



This page made possible through the courtesy of 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Railing 

and 

Mr. and Mrs. John Doherty 



Page 261 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF '58 

— _— — — ir— ■ — — ~ 




FROM AN ALUMNUS OF '54, '55, '56, '57 



Page 262 



Compliments Of 

MR. & MRS. JOAQUIN SANTOS 


Jam $^ m YOUR 

™ % m 1958 

SEE %F% f"^p CHEVROLET 

# 1 
BOB FISHER 
at 

YOUR FIRST CLASS DEALER 
MURPHY-MAHONEY 

CHEVROLET 

2986 NORTH SPEER BOULEVARD 
GL 5-4747 OPEN EVENINGS 

Same owners at the same location 

Selling— Serving— Satisfying 

For 38 Years 




H mm 

Bk i Wm Mm 

Compliments of 

THE HEIL PACKING CO. 

of 

St. Louis 



Page 263 



Growing with Denver 



m 



M 



wzzmsmebm* 



I i i 

i l 

9 ft 
1 



I 

fi i i 



s 



llairrWliLl.l 



• if i 

I fee 



*HiU\V 



* tit ill i 



^«a 



-/-,..-,■ 



Beautiful new Home Office Building to be erected this 
year in the Cherry Creek Business Center of Denver. 



Now in our 28th year 

Capital and Surplus over 
$2,000,000. 

$117 in Assets to every 
$100 in Liabilities. 

Over $51,000,000 of Insurance in full. 

An Old-Line, Legal-Reserve 

Company — Writing both 

participating and Nonparticipating 

Plans. 



SELECT TERRITORY 

California— Colorado— Idaho 

Nebraska— Kansas— Nevada 

New Mexico — Oregon 

South Dakota— Texas 

Washington— Wyoming 

Experienced Agents and General 
Agents are being offered top first 
year and vested renewal Com- 
missions. 



Greetings to another great Denver Institution — Regis College. 
Graduates are invited to talk with us on worth-while opportunities 
with our organization. 



BANKERS UNION LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

C. B. McCORMICK, PRESIDENT 

1300 Grant St. Denver, Colorado 



Page 264 



LUETHY'S KITCHEN 

Home of Good Food 

5004 N. Federal Blvd. 
On Highway 287 

Denver 11, Colorado 

Glendale 5-0055 


Compliments of 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Gaynor 


Compliments of 

John F. McCarthy 

class of '28 
Taos, New Mexico 


MULKINS GARAGE 

Body Work — Painting — Auto Repair 
Accessories 

4949 Lowell 

Jess Mulkins Prop. 

Home: GE 3-4456 Denver, Colo. 

GR 7-6770 


MORRISON • GREENE # SEYMOUR, INC. 

3800 West Vliet St. 
Milwaukee 8, Wisconsin 

Marketing through Creative Advertising 


For Italian Foods 

C. PINELLI & CO. 

1409 15th Street 
Keystone 4-4318 Denver, Colo. 


Compliments 
of 

Charles B. McCormick 

Charles B. McCormick, Jr. 

Grace M. McCormick 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Sermonet 

Mr. & Mrs. Tom Harmer 

A. R. Meininger 
Thomas W. Moffat, M.D. 



Page 265 



Compliments 


of 


THE SWITZER LICORICE 


COMPANY 


SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI 


Compliments 
of 


Tuley Drug Store 


LEHRER'S FLOWERS 


Prescription Druggist 


3301 West 38th 






50th and Quitman 


Denver, Colorado 
GR 7-1688 


GR 7-0021 Denver, Colo. 


Your Motorola Dealer 


For 


In this area 


Quick and Dependable 




Service see 


SAM'S 


NELSON'S 


RADIO and PHONOGRAPH 


CONOCO 




STATION 


4974 Lowell Blvd. 




Denver, Colorado 


4900 Lowell Blvd. Denver, Colo. 


GL 5-0744 


GR 7-9960 



Page 266 



UNIVERSAL STUDIOS 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 
FOR THE 1958 RANGER 



420 16th Street 1526 North Broadway 

Denver, Colorado 



Pace 267 




The New Student Center 



(^onaratu lationA ^enlo 



9 



r5 



THE 
REGIS CLUB 

extends 

cordial greetings 

on the occasion of your 

Graduation 



Page 268 



For the speediest in dry cleaning see 



1 HOUR CLEANERS 



Colors glow like new again 
Tops in quality and Service 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 

So easy to keep that 
well groomed look. 




Page 269 




Page 270 



CONGRATULATIONS 
from 




BOB JONES' 



Big 3 

BknlaaA motors, 

COLORADO'S LARGEST FORD DEALER 



Broadway & Arapahoe 



TAbor 5-5281 



BOB JONES' 



Midw&y, 



MOTOR COMPANY 



COLORADO'S LARGEST MERCURY DEALER 
and featuring the ENGLISH FORD 



8200 W. Colfax 



BEImont 3-6515 



BOB JONES' 



EDSEL and English Ford 



8200 W. Colfax 



Be 3-6515 



TOP DEALS • HIGHEST TRADES • BANK RATE FINANCING 



Colorado's Largest Volume Automobile Dealer 



Page 271 



GoMxyudidxriifrHA, 



REGIS COLLEGE GRADUATES 



Class of '58 




7':\ 




Wonderful Dobbs House 
Food and Beverages 

Banquet-Party 
Meeting Rooms 

Valley Highway at Speer 
Denver, Colorado 




In all of Denver 
Nothing can compare 

Country Club 

Atmosphere with 

Downtown 

Convenience 




Page 272 



To the Brothers of ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 



we wish to express our sincere 

gratitude for their cooperative 

and ambitious effort which 

helped to make this 

yearbook possible. 



THE RANGER STAFF 




Page 273 



advertising index 



A 

ACME CHEMICAL CO 241 

ALMA PISTON CO 256 

ALTA VISTA GROCERY 246 

ASHKER'S SERVICE 255 

B 

BANKER'S UNION LIFE INSURANCE CO 264 

BILLY'S INN 249 

BOB HARFERT 239 

BONFIRE LOUNGE 250 

C 

C. B. GILLIAND 243 

CENTER PHARMACY 242 

CHEERIOS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 246 

COLORADO BADGE CO 249 

CONTINENTAL-DENVER HOTEL 272 

COUGHLTN AND CO 259 

C. PINELLI AND CO 265 

CURDOLAC FOOD CO. 246 

D 

DENVER GOLF AND TENNIS 249 

DENVER WHOLESALE MEATS 259 

E 

EDDIE BOHN'S PIG AND WISTLE 258 

EDELWEISS 241 

ERNIES SUPPER CLUB 239 

F 

FEHR'S FLOWERS 246 

FREEMAN SHOE CORPORATION 254 

G 

GOLF LAND 252 

GORMAN AND SON MEAT MARKET 242 

H 

HARMONY RECORD SHOP 251 

HEIL PACKING CO 263 

HICKS-DENVER 253 

J 

JACK AND TEENY'S BAR AND GPJLL 248 

JEFFERSON RECORD 246 

JEFFERSON TYPEWRITER 242 

JIM'S PIZZERIA 248 

K 

KINGS COURT LOUNGE 242 

KOHLBERG'S 242 

KORN'S MEN'S SHOP 250 



L 

LABATES PIZZERIA 244 

LEHRER'S FLOWERS 266 

LINDAHL'S 242 

LOG CABIN INN 240 

LOWELL PHARMACY 252 

LUETHY'S KITCHEN 265 

M 

MARHOEFER PACKING CO 246 

MARIGOLD CAFE 253 

MERKL'S SERVICE STATION 252 

MORRIS ALPERT 251 

MOUNTAIRE FARMS 248 

MORRISON-GREENE-SEYMOUR INC 265 

MULKIN'S GARAGE 265 

MURPHY-MAHONEY 263 

MURRAY BROS 257 

N 

NELSON'S CONOCO STATION 266 

NEWSFOTO 275 

Q 
QUEENIE'S PIZZERIA 257 

R 

R & C WHOLESALE 240 

RANDALL'S 255 

S 

SAMBOL PACKING CO 243 

SAM'S RADIO & PHONOGRAPH 266 

SAVE-TIME LAUNDRYETTE 244 

SEIFERT PONTIAC-CADILLAC 253 

SHAMROCK RESTAURANT 250 

SKYLAND FORD 271 

STAN'S BERKELEY SINCLAIR 249 

SWITZER LICORICE CO 266 

T 

THE SINK 248 

THE SPORTSMAN INN 251 

TULEY DRUG STORE 266 

U 
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS 267 

V 
VINCENT SYRUP CO 258 

W 
WILLIAM CROW 260 



Page 274 







UBLISHING COMPANY 




H€UJsfo"to 



I 



■Mk , Ji 




Page 275 



PATR' 

Rev. Thomas P. Barry 


ONS 

Denver, Colorado 


Rev. C. B. Woodrich 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. J. A. Ash 


Colorado Springs, Colorado 


Mr. Charles T. Bastien 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Fred Berger 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. M. A. Birdsall 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. William L. Blick 


Roggen, Colorado 


Mrs. E. H. Bollwerk 


University City, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. C. W. Brady 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Ray P. Brophy 


Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 


Mr. Martin J. Burns 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. John Burke 


Denver, Colorado ' 


Mr. & Mrs. S. F. Caulfield 


Los Alamos, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. E. M. Cline 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Joe Coffee 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. John R. Compton 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. G. Connelly 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. James J. Cullen 


Cheyenne, Wyoming 


Mr. Edward J. Curran 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. D. A. DeRochie 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. Francis M. Dierks 


Hot Springs, Arkansas 


Mr. John M. Distel 


Silvertown, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Harry J. Doring 


Kansas City, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. L. A. Doyle 


Pueblo, Colorado 


Mr. Hugh Duncan 


Glenrock, Wyoming 


Mr. Francis Flynn 


University City, Missouri 


Mr. Frank S. Foti 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. Bill Freeman 


Denver, Colorado 


Mrs. Marie Frei 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. J. F. Gallegos 


La Jara, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Geary 


Leadville, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Gilser 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. John F. Hanafer 


Champaign, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Hanley 


Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 


Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Hanson 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Paul Horan 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. J. R. Jaramillo 


Denver, Colorado 



Page 276 



PATR 


ONS 


Dr. & Mrs. Francis L. Kennedy 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mrs. Mary B. Kiley 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. V. A. Klein 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Edward G. Kummet 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. L. M. Lopez 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Lamar Lunt 


Santa Fe, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. George Lutito 


Denver, Colorado 


t>Ar. & Mrs. Frank J. Lyons 


Mitchell, South Dakota 


Mr. & Mrs. R. W. Moore Sr. 


Denver, Colorado 


Miss Ann Morrison 


Hartland, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. G. C. Mulqueen 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Frank J. Muench 


Elm Grove, Illinois 


Mr. Frank Nemeth Jr. 


East Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. Jack Noble 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Charles Nocera 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. J. O'Brien 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd O'Hollearn 


Wheaton, Illinois 


Mrs. Marie A. O'Neill 


St. Paul, Minnesota 


Mr. Steve DiPaola 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. J. A. Powers 


Riverside, Illinois 


Dr. & Mrs. L. W. Raven 


Kenosha, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Reddick 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. J. W. Schulte 


Casper, Wyoming 


Mr. Norman B. Scott 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Seitz 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


Mr. & Mrs. David H. Sharkey 


Toulon, Illinois 


Mr. Harry Siems 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Francis Sprehe 


Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 


Mrs. J. A. Steinlage 


University City, Missouri 


Mr. Joseph Tarabino 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Dr. & Mrs. F. J. Tobin 


Mitchell, South Dakota 


Mr. Fred Vap 


McCook, Nebraska 


Mr. John Walker 


Cicero, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Welsh 


Great Bend, Kansas 


Mr. & Mrs. L. E. Welte 


Colorado Springs, Colorado 


Mr. M. P. Wetzel 


Clayton, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Yax 


Lincoln, Nebraska 


Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Zarlengo 


Denver, Colorado 



Page 277 



student 



Creamer, James W. 49, 109, 163, 178, 182 



Abramo, Joseph 
Albert, Don J. 
Allen, George T. 
Allen, William M. 
Almada, Ragael J. 
Arvidson, James E. 
Ash, Ken H. 
Avila, Peter A. 



59 
59 

59, 227 
73 
73 

59, 215 

152, 201 

47 



Babbitt, Kenneth J. 








35 


Babka, James R. 






47, 


219 


Bailey, Jack N. 








59 


Baldwin, George N. 






59, 


209 


Baltes, Don E. 








59 


Ban, Paul D. 








73 


Barnes, Richard J. 








59 


Barth, Theodore J. 


73, 


167, 


169, 


201 


Baumgartner, Robert B. 








59 


Beacom, Jerry D. 








60 


Beal, Duane L. 






60, 


181 


Bearvais, Edward R. 








35 


Beck, Darrell L. 








73 


Beddoes, Morris G, 








73 


Bell, John D. 








73 


Bennett, James V. 






60, 


179 


Bergkamp, Robert J. 






47, 


218 


Beutner, George A. 






4/, 


171 


Birdsall, Thomas C. 


35, 


170, 


183, 


221 


Blackford, Lawrence C. 






73, 


163 


Blatter, Frank E. 








73 


Blick, Kenneth W. 




60, 


160, 


171 


Blubaugh, Sidney A. 


35 


98, 


158, 


159 


Blum, Henry C. 


47, 


168, 


223, 


234 


Boatright, James F. 








60 


Boeckman, Donald H. 








60 


Boedeker, Robert C. 








' 74 


Bohn, Dennis A. 






55 


, 74 


Bollwerk, William J. 




25 


99, 


127, 






158, 


218, 


234 


Boone, Dennis W. 




60, 


127, 


228 


Borgerding, Robert M. 




35, 


179, 


217 


Borgerding, Roman 








35 


Bowles, Thomas 








74 


Boyle, Joseph J. 








47 


Brady, Lawrence E. 47, 


108, 


144, 


160, 


170 


Brady, William M. 


48 


, 60, 


162, 


197 


Bravdica, George P. 








219 


Bricker, Mike T. 








209 


Brisnehan, James L. 








74 


Britt, Robert E. 60, 


164, 


166, 


187, 


235 


Brophy, Michael R. 


35 


48, 


166 


167 


Brown, William L. 






60, 


160 


Bruggeman, Robert A. 






60 


160 


Buckley, Robert G. 








36 


Burke, Joseph K. 






74, 


215 


Burke, Michael F. 






60, 


72? 


Burns, Brian C. 








74 


Bustos, Bernard J. 


74, 


164, 


169 


714 


Butler, James P. 


48, 


127, 


171, 


182 



Cabella, James W. 






61 


, 74 


Callender, Leigh W. 








48 


Cambria, Frank A. 34, 


36 


109, 


179 


219 


Cambria, John M. 




48, 


183 


718 


Carbone, Anthony J. 






61, 


162 


Carbone, Vincent F. 


36, 


163, 


168, 


177 


Caricato, Lewis A. 






61, 


170 


Carney, James J. 








74 


Caulfield, Francis J. 








74 


Cavaliere, Eugene C. 




48, 


173, 
175, 


174, 

735 


Cawley, Frank 








174 


Cecchine, Carl L. 






48, 


181 


Cerrone, Vincent P. 






176, 


IRI 


Champeau, Donald J. 


36 


99, 


170 


227 


Chase, Joseph L. 36, 


160, 


170, 


172, 


174 


Chavez, Jack B. 








36 


Chavez, Uvaldo S. 






36 


181 


Chiodine, Richard J. 








61 


Chiolero, Leo A. 






49 


176 


Christopher, Michael G. 








141 


Cinocco, Nicholas L. 








74 


Civerolo, John J. 








75 


Clark, James T. 




75, 


715 


??R 


Clinton, Edward L. 








75 


Close, Henry J. 3i 


, 36 


53, 


100 


183 


Cloutman, Anthony J. 


58 


61, 


165 


735 


Cocozzella, Pete 


49, 


168 


181 


230 


Compton, Romauld P. 








37 


Compton, Stephen J. 






61, 


163 


Connelly, Robert J, 








75 


Coogan, Joseph J., Jr. 








49 


Cordova, Donald E. 








61 


Cosimi, A. Benedict 






61 


16? 


Coughlin, George F. 








61 



Croak, Thomas E. 
Crubaugh, John W. 
Culig, Joseph W. 
Cullen, Gerald J. 
Cummings, Joseph P. 

Curran, Edward L. 



57, 75, 166, 167 

75, 167 

49, 170 

160, 166 

34, 37, 100, 

162, 163, 177 

37 



Danahey, James P. 
Danchertsen, Chas. I 
Davidson, Gary R. 
Dawson, Barry T. 
Dawson, Patrick K. 
Dean, Thomas K. 

Deasy, John F., Jr. 
Degenhard, Frank J. 
DeLeon, John L. 
DeRochie, Tom M. 
DeSa, Russell M. 
DeWitt, John R. 
Dierks, Francis M. 
Dietz, Robert R. 
DiLisio, Leonard J 
Dillon, Donald F. 
Dines, Richard A. 
Distel, Ronald A. 
Dobbs, David C. 
Dollahan, Michael C. 
Donahue, Thomas M. 
Dooher, Terry E. 
Doring, Paul J. 
Doyle, Louis V. 
Doyle, Paule E. 
Dube, John J. 
Dugan, Hohn H. 
Duncan, Bernard J. 
Dunham, Lee R. 
Dunn, Michael E. 
Durand, Arthur L. 
Dursey, Anthony M. 
Dwyer, Joseph M. 



Eby, Dave H. 
Elliott, Edward E. 
Englehart, Ray 
Erhard, Michael W. 

Erskine, William A. 
Espinoza, Kenneth J. 
Etzkorn, Tobert L. 
Everding, Thomas A. 
Eyre, Richard C. 



58, 61, 163, 

62, 

46, 49, 



46, 50, 
50, 160, 168, 

37, 182, 



76, 



62, 



177 
75 

221 

170, 172 

162, 215 

108, 164, 

182, 187 

75, 174 

50 

75 

50 

50 

228 

160, 166 

75, 164 
173, 186 

76 

62 

76 

50, 76 

208, 219 

76, 193 

62 

37, 171 

160, 166 

50, 171 

193, 234 

178, 215 

62 

164, 167 

76 

37, 168 

76 

'.0 



62, 201 

50 

160, 170, 177 

37, 160, 177, 

187, 235 

76 

51 

62 

62 

62 



62, 
192, 

76, 



Fabac, Joseph W. 




76 


164, 


214 


Fabry, George J. 








76 


Fehringer, John R. 








62 


Farrell, Blair K. 


62, 


109, 


164, 


165 


Fischer, Robert L. 






76, 


174 


Fisher, Donald J. 








51 


Fletcher, Paul D. 






77, 


197 


Flynn, Francis R. 








77 


Foley, John B. 


77, 


164, 


226, 


228 


Foti, Theodore J. 


63, 


179, 


193, 


714 


Frank, Clem M. 






77, 


234 


Freeman, Thomas P. 








63 


Frei, Alphonse E. 








162 


Frenchmore, Raymond 


C. 






63 


Fuermann, Charles J. 








69 


Fulham, John C. 








63 



Gabel, Richard J. 
Gahl, James F. 
Gallagher, Dennis J. 
Gallegos, Donald L. 
Gallegos, Edward H. 
Gannon, Bill J. 
Gappa, Richard J. 
Garcia, Leroy L. 
Gatens, John T. 
Gatens, Maurice F. 
Gaynor, John J. 
Geary, John C. 
Geraghty, John A. 
Gerweck, Louis A. 
Gillen, Dennis G. 
Godfrey, James P. 
Goetz, Robert J. 
Golden, William P. 
Gormley, Edward F. 
Gottschalk, James C. 



38 



77 
63 

77, 165 

77 

37, 171, 174 

63, 162, 235 

167 

77 

127, 219 

78, 214 
38, 187 
78, 167 
63, 179 

38 

63, 166 

78, 167 

51, 171 

63 

38 

61, 78, 167 



Gould, John D. 
Graham, Chuck A. 
Gregory, William C. 
Griffin, Thomas M. 
Gubbins, Roger D. 
Guyer, James B. 

H 

Hackethal, Clem R, 
Halaska, John V. 
Hall, Donald J. 
Hammond, Joe M. 
Hammonn, Jack C. 
Hanafee, Patrick L. 
Handova, Richard E. 
Hanly, Paul J. 
Hanson, James J. 
Harmer, Thomas H. 
Hauser, Frank D. 
Hartenbach, Warren C. 
Harmer, Earle J. 
Hawn, Lawrence E. 
Herrick, Glen R. 
Hasse, Richard W. 
Haug, Norman L. 
Hawley, Joseph W. 39, 
Hartmeyer, John W. 
Haushalter, Jerry L. 
Heil, Richard B. 
Hennessey, John W. 
Hermes, Ronald D. 

Hibbison, Craig A. 
Higgins, Patrick T. 
Hill, Gordon A. 
Hilmer, Richard M. 
Hitzelberger, Tom F. 
Holland, Richard P. 
Hofsetz, James F. 
Horan, R. Paul 
Horn, Sol W. 
Houston, William B. 
Hudson, Andrew K. 
Hules, Frederick F. 64, 
Humann, Steve B. 
Humphreys, Harry W. 



Jaramillo, John F. 
Jiron, Danny G. 
Johnson, Clyde D. 
Johnson, Paul M. 
Jordon, Wilbur F. 
Jould, Kenneth R. 



38, 220 

38 

64 

160, 171, 228 

38, 182, 231 

64 







51 


38, 


182, 


235 




64, 


214 
78 
51 


78, 


167, 


214 




78, 


164 
78 

39 




78, 


193 
78 


39, 


101, 


215 
164 
64 
52 




39, 


185 




39, 


201 


101, 171, 


177, 


181 


64, 75, 


164, 


234 


64, 


142, 


178 


78, 


164, 


168 




28, 


168 


39, 108, 


174, 


179, 




187, 


234 
79 


79, 


164, 


228 
79 


64, 


169, 


215 


79, 


143, 


164 


39, 


194, 


209 
170 


72 


. 79, 


180 




39, 


181 
79 
64 


164, 166, 


169, 


180 

52 
79 



64 
64, 171 
79 
79 
80 
80, 168, 183, 214 



K 

Kailing, A. Michael 
Kearney, James J. 
Keenan, James D. 
Kelly, Richard E. 
Kelly, Richard 
Kennedy, Dennis M. 
Kennedy, Mike H. 
Kent, Ronald J. 
Kiefer, William C. 
Kiley, Harold A. 
Kilpatrick, Gerald G. 
Kirby, John W. 
Klein, Andrew M. 65, 
Kmitch, David P. 
Klein, Lawrence C. 
Koning, Thomas M. 
Kopp, Martin R. 
Kosednar, John H. 
Kosednar, Louis J. 
Kosmiscki, Patrick W. 
Kroneberger, Keith J. 
Krueger, James E. 
Kukar, Thomas J. 
Kummet, David N. 



Lalich, Robert D. 
Landauer, Thomas C. 
LaNoue, Terry K. 
Larkin, Thomas R. 
Lennon, Robert A. 
Lindeman, John F. 
Linnenberger, Robert L. 
Linnebur, Tom A. 
Logue, Robert T. 
Logan, Michael J. 
Lopez, Henry C. 
Loskouski, Peter L. 
Loughman, Daniel L. 
Luepke, Thomas J. 
Lunt, David L. 







80, 


167 
65 




52, 


200, 


234 


64, 


160, 


161, 


166 


52, 


177, 


181, 


219 




80, 


214, 


234 


40 


, 55, 


179, 


219 






65, 


218 




62, 


166, 


218 

80 

52 






65, 


168 


166, 


179, 


192, 


214 

80 

201 

80 


40, 


178, 


219, 


228 
167 
80 
80 
80 






40, 


186 






50, 


185 
80 

52 






81, 


165 
81 
81 
81 




52, 


201, 


218 




53, 


127, 


228 






81, 


167 
81 
65 

81 




81, 


173, 


183 
65 
66 




53, 


166, 


173 



Page 278 






index 



Lutito, George F. 
Luttrell, Thomas L. 
Lyons, Joseph M. 



40, 102, 158, 



159, 171 
66 

82 



Mc 



McClanahan, Donald L. 
McCarthy, Charlie J. 

McCarthy, David C. 

McColm, Robert M. 
McConnell, Thomas D. 
McCormick, Charles B. 
McCormack, James C. 
McCoy, John L. 
McCue, Mike, A. 
McDermott, John F. 
McDonough, William J. 
McLaughlin, Peter J. 

M 



82, 



82 

46, 53, 109, 

166, 167, 179 

55, 66, 164, 

166, 169, 234 

66, 215 

82, 160, 167 

66, 82 

227 

192, 193, 234 

215 

66 

40, 179, 219 

82, 227 



Madden, Thomas F. 




82, 


187 


Maggio, Frank P. 


66, 


188, 


193 


Mahoney, Hugh A. 






82 


Mahoney, James L. 






82 


Mahli, Maurice 




82, 


174 


Malloy, Regis P. 53, 


109, 168, 


172, 


175 


Mangus, Vincent A. 






53 


Mangus, Bill C. 






66 


Mansfield, Arthur J. 






40 


Mapelli, Mario J. 


66, 


163, 


167 


Marcotte, Harold D. 


66, 


127, 


153 


Markey, Joseph F. 






171 


Marks, Dennis C. 






82 


Marquez, Lawrence D. 






66 


Marrin, Lawrence W. 






82 


Marshall, Howard E. 




53, 


127 


Martelon, George A. 






230 


Martin, James R. 






83 


Martinez, Jimmy 






83 


Martinez, Eleuterio J. 




54, 


170 


Martinez, Manuel A. 






54 


Martinez, Roger D. 






40 


Marvel, William M. 






67 


Mayer, Mike F. 


72, 83, 


167, 


192 


Meiers, William H. 




54, 


171 


Meisel, J. Keith 


67, 


178, 


214 


Mejia, Michael R. 






67 


Meredith, George H. 






67 


Merz, Robert P. 




67, 


160 


Meurer, John F. 


55 


, 83, 


192 


Meyer, John L. 




72 


, 83 


Meyer, Ray F. 




67, 


234 


Meyer, Steve F. 




83, 


187 


Michelli, Thomas D. 






83 


Middleton, John G. 






67 


Millard, Herb C. 


83, 


127, 


228 


Miller, George S. 






83 


Miller, James L. 


67, 


215, 


227 


Molchan, James L. 




At 


, 54 


Moore, Donald E. 






40 


Moore, James O. 




127, 


228 


Moore, Robert F. 




176, 


181 


Morales, Evaristo 




72 


, 84 


Moran, Patrick G. 




54, 


200 


Morrison, Edwin J. 




84, 


193 


Moynihan, Robert D. 


41, 


161, 


173, 






177, 


180 


Mueller, Gene L. 


67, 160, 


168, 


171 


Muench, Arno J. 54, 


160, 166, 


172, 


234 


Mulqueen, Paul M. 






67 


Muna, Jesus G. 






84 


Murphy, Thomas A. 






170 


Mynatt, Gary L. 






68 



N 



Nalty, Raymond J. 
Nass, Raymond D. 

Nemeth, Donald F. 
Nickels, Mathew L. 
Noe, Gerald J. 



68 

41, 102, 152, 158, 

159, 179, 182 

68, 160 

54, 185 

54 



O'Brien, Emmett M. 
Obst, James E. 
O'Connor, James E. 
O'Connor, James F. 
O'Donoghue, William J. 
O'Donnell, Christopher 
O'Grady, Richard J. 
O'Hallearn, Lloyd S. 
O'Hallearn, Michael J. 
O'Meara, Michael J. 
O'Meara, Owen P. 
O'Neal, Eugene P. 





54, 


179 




68, 


178 




55, 


187 


108, 


162, 


163 
41 


160, 


187, 


228 




68, 


172 


178, 


196, 


223 


1,73 


178 


217 
68 
84 


103, 


160, 


187 



O'Neill, Patrick H. 
O'Rourke, John R. 
Ortiz, Louis L. 
Otero, Dan L. 
Owens, John E. 



Paoli, Peter J. 
Paoli, Terry D. 
Parisi, Tom J. 

Park, George M. 42, 

Pepin, Thomas H. 
Perrella, Victor A. 
Perry, Ronald A. 
Petralia, Louis S. 
Peterson* Daniel C. 
Pfanenstiel, James L. 
Phillips, James R. 
Pingpank, James F. 42, 63, 
Pino, Thomas E. 
Piper, Bruce W. 
Pipkin, Robert D. 
Pittelkow, Charles R. 
Powers, Edward J. 



84, 165, 176 
55 
41 

84, 168, 182 
55 







41 


84, 


160, 


167 
68 


183, 


208, 


219 
170 
55 




84, 


164 




42, 


176 

215 

84 

176 


152, 


179, 


219 

84 
84 
85 
85 




55, 


230 



Ragon, Lee R. 


85, 165, 


201, 


226 


Raine, James R. 


34, 42, 


103, 


166, 






167, 


169 


Rauen, James L. 




85, 


167 


Reddick, Raymond C. 




55, 


185 


Regan, Thomas J. 




170, 


197 


Rehan, Robert G. 




l/b, 


21/ 


Reichwein, Frank V. 






85 


Reinecke, Mark E. 






85 


Remington, Tom J. 


85, 


167, 


214 


Rhoades, Ralph F. 






85 


Rice, Gregory P. 






85 


Richardson, Ralph H. 






86 


Roach, William W. 




68, 


174 


Robinson, John A. 






235 


Robison, Leo R. 




86, 


234 


Roblee, Michael J. 


86, 


160, 


187 


Rohhnger, Otto J. 






86 


Rohrer, Richard L. 


42, 169, 


170, 


208 


Romano, Charles J. 






86 


Rotar, Paul A. 




42, 


231 


Rotter, Louis C. 




56, 


171 


Rottino, David A. 






215 


Rozmiarek, Kenneth R. 






86 


Ruybal, Alonzo N. 






86 


Ryan, Donald A. 






86 


Ryan, Joseph G. 




75 


, 86 



Salaz, Ernest E. 








86 


Sambol, James M. 


68, 


187, 


193, 


194 


Samide, Daniel E. 




42, 


104, 


168 


Sandoval, Elvinio 








42 


Sandoval, Irvin P. 






161, 


222 


Santos, Edward L. 








68 


Santopietro, Anthony F. 








43 


Sargent, Peter M. 








86 


Scaglia, Thomas N. 








180 


Schaefer, William E. 


61 


, 69, 


178, 


208 


Schenk, Robert J. 






43, 


219 


Schieferecke, George A 






69, 


160 


Schippers, John T. 




69, 


160, 


215 


Schroer, Richard M, 






86, 


141 


Schmitz, William J. 








43 


Schneider, Tom F. 






87, 


193 


Schneringer, Ray F. 








56 


Schropfer, Jerome H. 








69 


Schulte, John L. 








87 


Schwab, Peter A. 








185 


Schwartz, Edward A. 






87, 


187 


Scott, Bruce T. 








59 


Scott, Fred A. 








43 


Seidlinger, Monte D. 








87 


Sena, James R. 


43, 


104, 


158, 
173, 


159, 
183 


Sermonet, Ted J. 


43 


62, 


105, 


152, 




158, 


159, 


179, 


234 


Sferra, Franklin J. 


43, 


105, 


163, 


181 


Sharkey, Philip J. 


43, 


108, 


158, 


159, 






165, 


177, 


183 


Shea, John G, 






56, 


170 


Sheehy, Terrence C. 46 


56, 


109, 


127, 


179 


Shepard, Stanley S. 








69 


Shyne, Francis C. 








44 


Siems, Dennis H. 








87 


Sims, Harry S. 








87 


Smilanic, Robert J. 






44, 87 


Smith, Jerry L. 




87, 


141, 


143 


Smith, Robert G. 








69 


Smith, Robert M. 








87 


Smith, Vincent L. 




69, 


160, 


169 



Spear, Ralph J. 
Sprehe, David L. 69, 
Springer, Lawrence J. 

Stanko, John E. 56, 

Starbuck, Dennis" E. 
Stein, James B. 
Stein, Robert L. 
Steinauer, Jerome J. 
Steele, Richard L. 
Stewart, Robert O. 
Stewart, Thomas B. 
Stewart, William P. 
Styers, James D. 
Styers, John P. 
Sullivan, Joseph H. 
Summers, George D. 
Sutton, Samuel R. 
Swirczynski, Walter J. 
Switzer, David 







175, 201 


109, 


172, 


183, 215 




34, 


44, 162, 
163, 170 


152, 


166, 


218, 219 
88 




69, 


216, 217 
70 
56 
88 
88 
88 
44, 185 
70 

171, 172 


56 


65, 


160, 166 


44, 


162, 


177, 181 

56 

55, 77 


55 


88, 


192, 235 



Tafoya, Robert E. 






70 


Tainter, James F. 


72 


, 88, 


16/ 


Tapp, Robert M. 






88 


Tarabino, John 


56, 


216, 


21/ 


Tarabino, Joseph A. 






88 


Tawson, Bruce T. 






88 


Taylor, Allen L. 






44 


Taylor, James B. 




88, 


IV3 


Telatnik, Stephen C. 


70, 160, 


169, 


235 


Tenderich, Ernie S. 






/0 


Tenderich, Fred 






88 


Theisen, George A. 






88 


Thompson, David F. 






88 


Tobin, Frank J. 






89 


Toepfer, David J. 






89 


Torrey, Thomas G. 






44 


Torrez, Thomas J. 






70 


Tracy, Thomas J. 


89, 160, 


164, 


187 


Trenkle, John A. 






89 


Tritz, Howard A. 


44, 


201, 


227 



Valko, Bob M. 


57, 


179, 


200, 


234 


Vap, Douglas F. 








89 


Vendena, Kenneth R. 








70 


Verretta, James C. 






45, 


186 


Vescovo, Robert E. 


89, 


167, 


187, 


192 


Vigil, Jimmy F. 








70 


Villarreal, Joseph A. 








45 


Visnaw, David A. 




89, 


192, 


234 


Vitry, Richard J. 








45 


Volkert, Robert C. 








89 


Vollmer, Donald E. 




57, 


163, 


185 


Volmer, Lowell J. 








70 



w 



Walker, Carlo 


57, 


161, 


173, 


219 


Walker, John O. 








70 


Walrond, Jerome R. 






70, 


227 


Wanebo, Clifford K. 






57, 


178 


Ware, Joseph H. 






89, 


160 


Warner, David M. 








90 


Weber, Joseph P. 








85 


Weber, James H. 






45, 


184 


Weber, John T. 








180 


Welles, Martin W. 




45, 


272, 


778 


Wells, Michael V. 






90, 


179 


Welsh, Terry 71, 


108, 


179, 


187, 


194 


Welte, Lawrence E. 








90 


Weskamp, Richard D. 






90, 


152 


Wetzel, Jim M. 71 


78, 


160, 


170, 


234 


Whelan, William J. 58 


71, 


160, 


163, 


170 


Wilkinson, Raymond F. 






71, 


166 


Williams, Andrew K. 








90 


Williams, John L. 








71 


Williams, Michael R. 








71 


Wilson, K. Michael 








57 


Wise, Arthur N. 








90 


Woertman, Frank J. 








45 



Yacobellis, John F. 57, 173, 176, 181, 186 
Yax, James F. 90, 167 



Zarlengo, Albert E. 
Zarlengo, Ernest P. 
Zarlengo, Mario H. 
Ziegler, Emil B. 
Zito, Frank A. 
Zivic, William J. 
Zumbotel, Bert F. 



90 
90 
71 
71 

45 

168, 181, 201 

71 



Page 279 



the last word. 



"Parting is such sweet sorrow . . ." As the final copy is proofread, the last picture captioned, and the 
last staff member sinks back in complete exhaustion, the realization comes that another RANGER is now 
in the hands of its judges and, in a manner of speaking, another year at Regis is practically over. Its read- 
ers will pass final judgment on the end result but who will weigh, or who will know, the endless hours, 
the nerve-wracking pressure of deadlines, the irritation of missing pictures, that are part of this monu- 
ment to Regis, 1958? Likewise, who can measure the sense of personal accomplishment, the food fellow- 
ship, the fun that went into this work? All combined make this work the RANGER that is now in your 
hands. 

This past year in the history of Regis College has seen some of the most outstanding accomplish- 
ments since the move from Morrison in 1888. Most obvious steps in the continuing march of progress are 
the new buildings gracing the campus. With the opening of O'Connell Hall in time for the fall semester 
1957, comfortable living accommodations were made available to the boarding students. Contributing to 
the morale and well-being of the student body at large, the new Student Center has, since its opening in 
December, played such an integral part in the life of Regis that it is hard to remember a time without it. 

These two new buildings, with the new parking facilities and roads attendant upon their construc- 
tion, have already played a very important part in the fostering of a true Regis spirit. But they are but 
stepping stones on the road that leads to even greater improvements on the future campus: field house, 
library, science laboratories. 

Of a less tangible nature but none the less important have been the accomplishments during the 
past year in that somewhat nebulous area called spirit. The forging of a new student constitution did 
much to awaken the student body and to foster an awareness in the minds of a vast majority of the stu- 
dents of the dynamic life of the Regis campus. Contributing in measure overflowing to this spirit was the 
play of the basketball team, more often than not desscribed only as phenomenal. 

The individual achievements of many of the students, noted in the preceding pages, have brought 
renown both to the individuals and to the school. In line with this, the Awards Banquet must be singled 
out for mention as a major accomplishment in the publicizing of Regis College and its contributions to 
society. The RANGER wishes to extend its thanks and congratulations to the men and organizations who 
have done so much for the college. 

If the men in whose hands lies the future destiny of Regis continue on the trail blazed in the past, 
there will be no limit to the accomplishments possible. Regis College will continue to prosper, to grow, 
and to cement its position of leadership in the Rocky Mountain area. 

The work on the '58 RANGER is finished. The last copy has been filed, unused photos have been 
stored away, typewriters are covered, and the office is deserted. We have tried to preserve most of the 
high points (and some of the low) of the year 1957-1958. Our sincere thanks go to all the members of the 
staff who worked long and, sometimes thanklessly, to this end. Likewise, we want to acknowledge the 
help of many of the students and faculty members for their assistance in making this RANGER as com- 
plete as it is. 

The book is now yours. We hope you handle it (and us) gently. 




EUGENE P. O'NEAL 
Editor-in-Chief 



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